ctenidium


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ctenidium: ctenidia

ctenidium

(tĭ-nĭd′ē-əm)
n. pl. ctenid·ia (-ē-ə) Zoology
A comblike structure, such as the respiratory apparatus of a mollusk or a row of spines in some insects.

ctenidium

(pl. ctenidia) one of the comblike gills present in the mantle of many molluscs, particularly Lamellibranchia.

ctenidium

a spine which occurs in rows on the heads of fleas; called also combs; useful for morphological identification.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Legs mainly black without ventral ctenidium on hind femur and without erect posterior bristles medially on hind tibia.
Fore and mid tibia with inconspicuous ctenidium on anteroventral side and hind tibia without erect posterior bristles medially.
macroctenia Rafael -Hind femur with short anteroventral ctenidium, 3 subequal the ctenidium of fore and mid femora 3.
Fore coxa with 9 brown setulae on anterior surface; mid coxa with 8 brown setulae; fore tibia with ctenidium of 12 spinules.
Fore coxa with 18 brown setulae on anterior surface; mid coxa with 16 brown setulae; fore tibia with ctenidium of 10 spinules.
Fore coxa with 13 brown setulae on anterior surface; mid coxa with 7 brown setulae; fore tibia with ctenidium of 14 spinules.
Fore coxa with 9 brown setulae; mid and hind coxa silver-yellow pruinose, mid coxa with 3 brown setulae; hind coxa with 2 brown setula; fore tibia usually with 4 strong setae on lateral margin, the second basal seta of similar length to other three, with ctenidium of 7-9 short, sharp black spinules.
Fore coxa with 21 brown setulae; femora, tibia and tarsi slightly reddish yellow; tibia darker reddish apically; fore tibia with 4 strong setae on lateral margin, the second basal seta same length as first basal, with ctenidium of 10-13 long, sharp black spinules, separated from each other by two or more basal spinule widths.
Fore coxa with 8 brown setulae on anterior surface; mid coxa with 8 brown setulae; fore tibia with ctenidium of 12 short, sharp black spinules.
We used reduced major axis (Model II) regression to describe the relationships between ctenidium area and body mass for the three species (LaBarbera, 1989).
Cilia on the ctenidium generate a current through the mantle cavity.