crystalloid


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Related to crystalloid: crystalloid solution

crystalloid

 [kris´tah-loid]
1. resembling a crystal.
2. a substance whose particles are smaller than those of a colloid, form a true solution, and are therefore capable of passing through a semipermeable membrane, as in dialysis. The physical opposite of a crystalloid is a colloid, which does not dissolve and does not form true solutions.

crys·tal·loid

(kris'tăl-oyd),
1. Resembling a crystal, or being such.
2. A body that in solution can pass through a semipermeable membrane, as distinguished from a colloid, which cannot do so.
3. A hydration solution that contains only electrolytes.

crystalloid

[kris′təloid]
Etymology: Gk, krystallos + eidos, form
a substance in a solution that can diffuse through a semipermeable membrane. Compare colloid.

crys·tal·loid

(kris'tăl-oyd)
1. Resembling a crystal, or being such.
2. A body that in solution can pass through a semipermeable membrane, as distinguished from a colloid, which cannot do so.

crystalloid

1. resembling a crystal.
2. a noncolloid substance. Crystalloids form true solutions and therefore are capable of passing through a semipermeable membrane, as in dialysis. The physical opposite of a crystalloid is a colloid (3), which does not dissolve and does not form true solutions.

crystalloid particle
a matrix particle in a single membrane contained in a peroxisome, when viewed through an electron microscope. Called also nucleoid.
crystalloid solution
contains electrolytes and nonelectrolytes which will diffuse into all body fluid compartments. Examples are Ringer's solution and 5% dextrose in water.
References in periodicals archive ?
We decided to study a combination of 04 mg intravenous ondansetron and crystalloid preloading at dose of 10 ml/kg for prevention of spinal anaesthesia induced hypotension.
This approach, which includes the use of resuscitation to blood pressure targets slightly below normal levels (80 mm to 90 mm Hg systolic) in order to minimize pressure-induced rebleeding--so-called "hypotensive resuscitation," and the avoidance of crystalloids and colloids has been termed damage control resuscitation (DCR).
Effects of fluid resuscitation with colloids vs crystalloids on mortality in critically ill patients presenting with hypovolemic shock: the CRISTAL randomized trial.
Zdolsek, "Distribution of crystalloid fluid changes with the rate of infusion: a population-based study", Acta Anaesth Scand, 2016.
Crystalloids are readily available and less expensive to administer than colloids.
16) However in our study we have used more colloid fluid instead of a substantial volume of crystalloid fluid in the restricted normal saline fluid group.
3 U/min can be achieved by the administration of 20 U of oxytocin in 1 L crystalloid solution at a rate of 15 mL/min until uterine tone is achieved.
9 per cent sodium chloride added is the most commonly used crystalloid for fluid replacement.
The operation took 6 hrs 4 units of packed red cells 400 mL of fresh frozen plasma 1700 mL of cell salvage 4100 mL of crystalloid solution and 3000 mL of colloid solution were transfused totally and the urine was
Isotonic crystalloid solutions are effective in the treatment of intravascular volume depletion due to fluid losses.
We hypothesised that intravenous gelatin is safe as a plasma expander and conducted a meta-analysis to assess whether gelatin solutions would result in excess mortality, a higher risk of bleeding requiring transfusion or higher rates of acute renal failure compared to a) intravenous crystalloid, b) starch, c) isotonic albumin solution or d) dextran in perioperative and critical care settings.
9% saline remains the most common intravenous crystalloid prescribed, with nearly ten million litres administered in the UK every year (Awad et al 2008a).