cryonics


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

cryonics

(krī-ŏn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The process of freezing and storing the body of a diseased, recently deceased person to prevent tissue decomposition so that at some future time the person might be brought back to life upon development of new medical cures.

cry·on′ic adj.

cryonics

[krī·on′iks]
Etymology: Gk, kryos, cold
the techniques in which cold is applied for a variety of therapeutic goals, including brief local anesthesia, destruction of superficial skin lesions, and preservation of cells, tissue, organs, or the entire body. cryonic, adj.

cryonics

The placing of a dead person or his or her head/brain in a frozen state, based on the hope that when medical science advances to the point of regenerating tissues and curing the disease that caused the person’s death, the person will be brought back from a state of supposed suspended animation and continue with his or her life. Brain tissue undergoes irreversible changes at death; there is no scientific data to support the claim that rejuvenation is possible.

cryonics

Freezing and storing the human body soon after death to preserve it indefinitely, in the hope that future scientific advances will allow correction of the process that caused the death, so that life can be restored.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryonics is the idea, introduced by Robert Chester Ettinger and Jean Rostand [35] of using low temperatures to preserve human bodies after death until it becomes possible to return them to life.
His daughter's body was taken from hospital in a van after a Cryonics UK ambulance broke down.
He suggests that the present generation may exploit these scientific advances by encouraging cryonic preservation.
There are only four cryonics centers in the whole world, so it shouldn't be too tough to pick.
But Dad would never agree to delay the transplant, and if that was successful, no court would require him to risk cryonic preservation.
In December 1963, 10 months before "Cryogenic Refrigerator" appeared in ME magazine, Evan Cooper, author of Immortality: Physically, Scientifically, Now, formed the Life Extension Society, the world's first cryonics organization.
The technology of giving back life after repairing one's body, known as cryonics, will be a reality soon.
The closing chapters about the cryonics and Williams' medical issues are tough to take at times, but it is an interesting read overall and only 300 pages long, a nice break from the 800-page bios that are proliferating these days.
If I have my blood replaced with saline, and then use cryonics to cool my body down yet further, could I be "dead" for a few months or weeks or years before being warmed up again?