cryoneurolysis

cryoneurolysis

(krī″ō-noo-rol′ĭ-sĭs) [ cryo- + neurolysis]
The destruction of a nerve by applying a very cold probe to it, e.g., one whose temperature is −321°F (the temperature of liquid nitrogen). It is one of the methods of neurolysis to treat intolerable nerve pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, April 22 ( ANI ): Patients of neuralgia, a condition where nerves are damaged by surgery, can get relief from a minimally invasive interventional radiology treatment called cryoneurolysis that places a tiny ball of ice on damaged nerves.
William Moore, MD, a thoracic interventional radiologist at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, completed more than 200 cryoneurolysis procedures for neuralgia to halt nerve pain in many areas of the body, from head to toe.
In the study, 20 patients received cryoneurolysis for a variety of neuralgia syndromes and were evaluated using a pain scale questionnaire immediately after treatment during one-week, one-month and three-month follow-ups after the initial procedure.
Moore, who recommends repeat cryoneurolysis treatments as needed.
The 184 chapters cover basic science, patient evaluation, imaging, various generalized and regional pain syndromes, and specific treatment modalities, including nerve blocks, neuroaugmentation and implantable drug delivery systems, and advanced techniques like diskectomy, cryoneurolysis, and radiofrequency lesioning.