cryoglobulinemia


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cryoglobulinemia

 [kri″o-glob″u-lin-e´me-ah]
the presence of cryoglobulin in the blood, associated with a variety of clinical manifestations including Raynaud's phenomenon, vascular purpura, cold urticaria, necrosis of extremities, bleeding disorders, vasculitis, arthralgia, neurologic manifestations, hepatosplenomegaly, and glomerulonephritis.

cry·o·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(krī'ō-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă),
The presence of abnormal quantities of cryoglobulin in the blood plasma.

cryoglobulinemia

/cryo·glob·u·lin·emia/ (-glob″u-lin-e´me-ah) the presence in the blood of cryoglobulin,which is precipitated in the microvasculature on exposure to cold.

cryoglobulinemia

[krī′ōglob′yoo͡linē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, kryos + L, globulus, small sphere; Gk, haima, blood
the presence of cryoglobulins in the blood. Presence of cryoglobulins may be associated with a variety of clinical disorders including Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, hepatitis C, multiple myeloma, and leukemia.

cryoglobulinemia

Primary cryoglobulinemia Hematology A condition caused by proteins that precipitate in vivo on cooling of acral parts, which are often associated with immune complex-related disease; cryoglobulinemia has been divided into 3 clinical forms Clinical Pain, cyanosis, arthralgias, vascular purpuras, cold intolerance, HTN, CHF Lab ↓ C4 and other complement proteins
Cryoglobulinemia
Type I Monoclonal cryoglobulinemia Underlying disease is often malignant; IgG (malignant myeloma), IgM macroglobulinemia or lymphoma/CLL, rarely others (eg IgA nephropathy), benign monoclonal gammopathy
Type II Poly-monoclonal cryoglobulinemia A complex of immunoglobulins, eg mixed IgM-IgG, G-G, A-G or other combinations that may be associated with lymphoreticular disease or connective tissue disease (rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, mixed essential cryoglobulinemia)
Type III Mixed polyclonal-polyclonal cryoglobulinemia Mixed IgG & IgM, ± IgA, due to rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, Sjögren syndrome, EBV, CMV, subacute bacterial infections, poststreptococcal, crescentic and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritides, DM, chronic hepatitis, biliary cirrhosis

cry·o·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(krī'ō-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
The presence of abnormal quantities of cryoglobulin in blood plasma.
Synonym(s): cryoglobulinaemia.

Cryoglobulinemia

Condition in which protein in the blood forms particles in the cold, blocking blood vessels and leading to pain and numbness of the extremities.

cryoglobulinemia

the presence of cryoglobulin in the blood, which is precipitated in the microvasculature upon exposure to cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
HCV can also lead to extrahepatic manifestations such as renal disease, for example, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia [4] that can eventually progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Extrahepatic (EH) manifestations associated with HCV infection include endocrinological manifestations such as diabetes mellitus (DM)[5] and thyroiditis,[6] rheumatologic manifestations such as arthralgias, arthritis[7] and cutaneous manifestations like essential mixed cryoglobulinemia, porphyrea cutanea tarda, lichen planus, sjogren syndrome,[8] and others like glomerulonephritis[9] and metabolic syndrome.
7,8) The paraprotein may also have autoantibody or cryoglobulin activity resulting in autoimmune phenomena or cryoglobulinemia.
4 Cryoglobulinemia, Lichen planus, pruritus and porphyria cutanea tarda are the most frequently associated skin manifestation of HCV while less common features include polyarteritis nodosa, urticaria, vitiligo, thrombocytopenic purpura, sjorgens syndrome, erythema multiforme and necrolytic erythema.
Cryoglobulinemia (CG) may present with a hyperviscosity syndrome and/or small vessel vasculitis.
Cryoglobulinemia, vasospasm due to immune complexes, hypercoagulopathy, and vasculitis are suggested as possible causes of the pathogenesis.
Chronic hepatitis C virus infection: prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations and association with cryoglobulinemia in Bulgarian patients.
It is important that such cases receive attention because cryoglobulinemia is often overlooked in diagnostic workups; however, several technical points regarding the analytical aspects of investigation require clarification.
However, there are research studies indicating that HCV is associated with various extrahepatic manifestations including mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Sjogren syndrome, porphyria cutaneous tarda, lichen planus, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and various endocrine and neurologic manifestations.
Because hypocomplementemia occurs commonly in patients infected with HCV, particularly when cirrhosis or cryoglobulinemia is present (4), these patients are at increased risk for meningococcal infection (3).
Up to 75% of patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia have HCV Purpura, weakness, and arthralgias are common manifestations of mixed cryoglobulinemia.
Important causes of type 1 RTA include autoimmune diseases like Sjogren's syndrome, Rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, Polyarteritis nodosa, Thyroiditis, Primary biliary cirrhosis, Cryoglobulinemia.