cryoglobulin


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Related to cryoglobulin: cryofibrinogen, Cryoglobulin Test, cryoglobulinemia

cryoglobulin

 [kri″o-glob´u-lin]
a serum globulin (invariably an immunoglobulin) that precipitates at low temperature (e.g., 4°C) and redissolves at 37°C. Cryoglobulins are classified as Type I, monoclonal immunoglobulins; Type II, immune complexes involving monoclonal immunoglobulins with antibody activity against polyclonal immunoglobulins; or Type III, immune complexes involving polyclonal immunoglobulins (in most cases, these are globulin-antiglobulin immune complexes like Type II complexes). Types I and II occur in plasma cell dyscrasias and lymphoproliferative disorders as well as in asymptomatic “essential” cryoglobulinemia. Types II and III occur in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren's syndrome. Type III also occurs in a wide variety of infectious diseases.

cryoglobulin

/cryo·glob·u·lin/ (-glob´u-lin) an abnormal globulin that precipitates at low temperatures and redissolves at 37° C.

cryoglobulin

[krī′ōglob′yoo͡lin]
Etymology: Gk, kryos + L, globulus, small sphere
an abnormal plasma protein that precipitates and coalesces at low temperatures and dissolves and disperses at body temperature.

cryoglobulin

Hematology An abnormal protein–eg, polymeric IgG3, detected by cooling serum to 32ºC Found in Myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, CLL, SLE. See Cryoglobulinemia.

Cryoglobulin

An abnormal blood protein associated with several diseases. It is characterized by its tendency to clump in cold temperatures.
Mentioned in: Cryoglobulin Test

cryoglobulin

an abnormal globulin that precipitates at low temperatures and redissolves at 98.6°F (37°C).
References in periodicals archive ?
Hepatitis serologies, serum cryoglobulins, an HIV screen, and a hypercoagulable workup were negative.
Problems with transporting serum to the laboratory for cryoglobulin assay: A solution.
Renal involvement in monoclonal (type I) cryoglobulinemia: two cases associated with IgG3K cryoglobulin.
Washing in a cold buffered saline solution may reduce the contamination, but it will also cause the loss of a variable amount of cryoglobulin.
The IgM-IgG immune complex formed the cryoglobulin.
Cryoglobulins that precipitate significantly at 20 to 30 C and as high as 36 C have been described(2) and may be associated with more serious symptomatology than other cryoglobulins with a lower cryoprecipitation point, present in significantly higher concentrations.
Other useful laboratory tests include serum protein/immunofixation electrophoresis and assay of free light chain to differentiate malignancy, tests for autoantibodies to rule out rheumatologic disease, and cryoglobulin characterization with blood cultures to exclude a diagnosis of infective endocarditis (1 ).
Additional laboratory data included negative testing results for antinuclear antibody, anti-Jo-1 antibody, anti-topoisomerase-1, anti-smooth muscle, perinuclear and cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, antimitochondrial antibody, antiglomerular basement membrane antibody, cryoglobulins, and human immunodeficiency virus antibody.
Although serum and plasma are necessary for detecting cryofibrinogenemia, cryoglobulin analysis is traditionally performed only on serum (1).
Cryoglobulin, p-antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody, c-antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody, antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, and antithrombin III, were all negative.
The tests for fluorescent antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, anti-double-stranded DNA, and cryoglobulin also were negative.