cryodamage

cryodamage

/cryo·dam·age/ (cri´o-dam″ij) damage to tissues, cells, or other biological substrates as a result of exposure to cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chemical and physical effects of these reagents/processes may cause extensive cryodamage to plasma membranes with resultant changes in their normal functions (Keel and Webster, 1993).
The aim of this investigation was to study the anti-inflammatory activity of the natural preparation inflaminat in animal model of aseptic inflammation in the loose connective tissue of skin of rats induced by cryodamage.
Recent studies report that the sperm plasma membrane is the primary site of cryodamage during freezing and thawing due to changes in its lipid and protein structure (Gao and Critser, 2000).
Storey, "Evidence for increased lipid peroxidative damage and loss of superoxide dismutase activity as a mode of sublethal cryodamage to human sperm during cryopreservation," Journal of Andrology, vol.
Although the cryodamage may be decreased following ovarian tissue vitrification, the optimal cryoprotectant with low toxicity is important for ovarian tissue vitrification.
Effects of antioxidants on post-thawed bovine sperm and oxidative stress parameters: antioxidants protect DNA integrity against cryodamage.
IDENTIFICATION OF CRYODAMAGE ON PLASMA MEMBRANE INTEGRITY IN BULL SPERMATOZOA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH FIELD FERTILITY
Addition of additives such as cysteine and lipoic acid to the semen freezing extender, may prevent cryodamage to spermatozoa metabolism and antioxidant capacities.
These protect spermatozoa from ROS producing abnormal spermatozoa, scavenge ROS produced by leucocytes, prevent DNA fragmentation, improve semen quality in smokers, reduce cryodamage to spermatozoa, block premature sperm maturation, and stimulate spermatozoa and improve assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcome.
Evidence for increased lipid peroxidative damage and loss of superoxide dismutase activity as a model of sublethal cryodamage to human sperm during cryopreservation.
Evidence that membrane stress contributes more than lipid peroxidation to sublethal cryodamage in cryopreserved human sperm: glycerol and other polyols as sole cryoprotectant.