cruciferous vegetable


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cruciferous vegetable

Nutrition
Any of a family of indole-rich vegetables (e.g., broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and mustard), which have anti-tumour-promoting activity in laboratory animals; colon cancer is associated with decreased consumption of cruciferous vegetables.

cruciferous vegetable

A family of vegetables (including broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, and cauliflower) named for their cross-shaped flowers. People who eat a diet rich in these vegetables are found to have a decreased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, strokes, and cancer, among other illnesses.
See also: vegetable
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus to get the very most health benefit from cruciferous vegetables, you have several choices.
Previous studies of people with bladder, prostate, breast and gut cancers have found that eating four to seven or more servings of cruciferous vegetables a week can prevent the growth of these cancers by 50 percent.
A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that a high intake of cruciferous vegetables reduced the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by as much as 22 %.
There is strong evidence that the protective action of cruciferous vegetables derives at least in part from isothyiocyanates (ITCs), a group of phytochemicals with well-known cancer-preventive activities.
Cruciferous vegetable compounds (such as I3C) are effective in shifting estrogen metabolism to the more beneficial pathway, thus reducing levels of 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone and increasing levels of 2-hydroxyestrone.
A good cruciferous vegetable supplement should contain I3C, DIM, and PEITC--and for even greater impact, should also include extracts of raw broccoli, cabbage, watercress, and other plant compounds such as apigenin.
Across increasing quartiles of cruciferous vegetable consumption, risk for total mortality decreased by 27 percent to 62 percent, risk for breast cancer-specific mortality decreased by 22 percent to 62 percent, and risk for recurrence decreased by 21 percent to 35 percent.
Of the vegetable servings, Reed suggests a minimum of three to four servings of cruciferous vegetables per week, including broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage, and Sauerkraut.
Dana Reed, certified nutrition specialist and dietitian suggests a minimum of three to four servings of cruciferous vegetables per week.
Italian scientists compared cruciferous vegetable intake, including cauliflower, among individuals with and without several common cancers.
Cruciferous vegetables have been shown to be protective in numerous studies, but this is the first comprehensive study that showed a protective benefit in smokers, specifically in former smokers, according to lead author Li Tang, Ph.
Overall, fruit and vegetable intake was inversely associated with risk of total mortality in both women and men, and a dose-response pattern was particularly evident for cruciferous vegetable intake.