crown gall

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crown gall

n.
A widespread plant disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and characterized by the formation of tumorous galls, especially at the junction of root and stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to grapevines, we have evidence that ARK-1 can effectively control apple, Japanese pear, peach, rose, and tomato crown gall caused by R.
This phenomenon needs further investigation because the ability of ARK-1 to colonize grapevine roots might affect the persistence of the control of crown gall by ARK-1.
However, the lack of control by dead cells and CF suspension indicated a different mechanisms for ARK-1 and that ARK-1 may have cellular functions to control crown gall formation.
This result indicated that the mechanism by ARK-1 to reduce crown gall symptoms might not involve the suppression of the Ti strain population in grapevine plants.
We also applied ARK-1 as a biological control of crown gall disease, and demonstrated that ARK-1 was able to control grapevine crown gall in field trials.
In conclusion, ARK-1 suppressed the expression of the virulence genes of the Ti strain at the wound site and suppressed the development of crown gall disease via what appears to be a previously unreported mechanism.
Research on the main details of crown gall disease may be completed in the 2000s, but major information is still needed regarding the incorporation of the T-strand into the plant nucleus and the subsequent steps producing plant hormones and opines in the plant cytoplasm.
Much is now known about crown gall disease in many dicotyledonous plants, but many aspects of the infection process are still unknown.
Figure 2 gives a general scheme of the sequence of reactions in crown gall disease leading up to the formation of the nodule on the external surface of the stem.
Ethylene has also recently been shown to play a critical role in crown gall morphogenesis (Aloni et al.
Habituation is often mentioned in the crown gall literature because of its striking resemblance to crown gall cell cultures that grow without the addition of exogenous hormones.
tumefaciens in crown gall tumor production includes a wide range of dicotyledonous plants mainly by phenolics in both herbaceous and woody plants, woody gymnosperms by means of resins and a phenolic glycoside (coniferin) in one case (184), and a few monocots (for example, asparagus, narcissus, gladiolus, yam) (Binns & Thomashow, 1988; Cervera et al.