crown gall


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crown gall

n.
A widespread plant disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and characterized by the formation of tumorous galls, especially at the junction of root and stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crown gall has been observed, while phylloxera has not yet led to vine decline in Indiana.
Crown gall infection takes place not only in vineyards but also in nurseries.
Crown gall is caused by the common soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefacians, which has the unique ability to transfer its own DNA into the DNA of the plant it infects in a process known as horizontal gene transfer.
The T-DNA oncogenes produce uncontrolled proliferation of crown gall cells via the production of auxins and cytokinins for the dividing plant cells and specific opines that are secreted as an energy source for the attached bacterium, but mainly for the surrounding aggregation of A.
McLaughlin (1991) concluded that the Crown Gall tumor (potato disc) assay could be used as a fairly rapid, inexpensive and reliable prescreen for antitumor activity.
Don't confuse crown gall with clumsy graft unions, which may make swellings but don't show notable changes in color or texture.
Crown gall is a serious problem in cold-climate vineyards, and every effort should be made to find certified crown gall-tested nursery materials.
Crown gall can lead to significant vine loss in a vineyard, and it is one of the major contributors to "replacement viticulture" (see photo above) practiced in cold climate wine regions, hardly a term that inspires visions of quality wines.
Hot water dipping was popularized in Australia as a successful defense against nematodes and crown gall, according to Vintage founder and co-owner Greg Sanders.
Major projects include the biology and control of grape crown gall, development of transgenic grapes for disease resistance and determining mechanisms of fungal-induced apple russet.
1997), and other work indicating that HWT also controls crown gall, nematodes, Pierce's disease and soil borne pathogens (Meagher, 1960; Goheen et al.
Although crown gall and Pierce's Disease are economically important throughout North America, these diseases are not quarantine regulated and are only monitored by visual inspection of foundation stock.