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Related to crosses: reciprocal crosses

cross

 [kros]
1. a cross-shaped figure or structure.
2. any organism produced by crossbreeding.
3. a method of crossbreeding.

cross

(kros),
1. Any figure in the shape of a cross formed by two intersecting lines. Synonym(s): crux
2. Synonym(s): crux of heart
3. A method of hybridization or the hybrid so produced.
[F. croix, L. crux]

cross

(kros)
1. a cross-shaped figure or structure.
2. any organism produced by crossbreeding; a method of crossbreeding.

cross

Etymology: L, crux
1 (in genetics) a mating between individuals with different phenotypes. Kinds of crosses include dihybrid cross, monohybrid cross, polyhybrid cross, and trihybrid cross.
2 any individual, organism, or strain produced from such a mating.

cross

(kraws)
1. Any figure or structure characterized by the intersection of two lines.
Synonym(s): crux.
2. A method of hybridization or the hybrid so produced.
[F. croix, L. crux ]

cross

  1. a mating between a male and a female of a plant or animal species, from which one or more offspring are produced.
  2. a hybrid produced by mating two unlike parents.

cross

1. a cross-shaped figure or structure.
2. any organism produced by mating genetically distinct individuals. See also crossbreeding, cruciate.

cross-cut grid
cross pregnancy
the fetus is in the horn on the side opposite to the corpus luteum.
cross table
see horizontal beam.
cross tie
a common method of restraining a horse for simple procedures such as grooming. The horse is tied to a pillar on either side, the shorter and tighter the better and preferably from the cheek dees of a hackamore. The head should be kept high to avoid the horse lashing out with both feet at once.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some crosses portray the anguish of Jesus in unflinching detail, reminding us that God is no stranger to our suffering; while others hold the deceased Christ, eyes closed and head bowed, a silent witness to the beautiful words of John's gospel: "For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that whoever believes in him might not perish but have eternal life" (John 3:16).
Tradition tells us that's how the three crosses in the old cistern were discovered, and Helena identified the "true cross" either deductively or by a miracle, depending on the source of the story.
Racist groups have long used burning crosses among their symbols, and to intimidate blacks, Jews, and other minority groups.
The Polish bishops also called for removal of all the crosses save the papal one.
The delivery mechanics of the four basic crosses vary slightly but all are designed to produce first-touch shots:
These additions and modifications also quietly testify to different gospel messages: the adorned bodiless crosses of the Byzantine world proclaim Christ overcoming death on the cross; the tortured medieval crucifixes are meant to move people to sorrow and repentance; the beautiful suffering Christs of the young Michelangelo or the mature Velazquez speak of the beautiful human dignity in death of the incarnate Christ.
Peter Klein, illustrates 70 different styles of crosses used in Christian iconography.