cross-tolerance


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cross-tolerance

 [kros´tol-er-ans]
extension of the tolerance for a substance to others of the same class, even those to which the body has not been exposed previously.

cross-tolerance

/cross-tol·er·ance/ (kros´tol-er-ans) extension of the tolerance for a substance to others of the same class, even those to which the body has not been exposed previously.

cross-tolerance

(krôs′tŏl′ər-əns, krŏs′-)
n.
Tolerance or resistance to an effect or effects of a compound as a result of tolerance previously developed to a pharmacologically similar compound.

cross-tolerance

a tolerance to other drugs that develops after exposure to a different agent. An example is the cross-tolerance that develops between alcohol and barbiturates.

cross-tol·er·ance

(kraws tol'ĕr-ăns)
The resistance to one or more effects of a compound as a result of tolerance developed to a pharmacologically similar compound.

cross-tol·er·ance

(kraws tol'ĕr-ăns)
Resistance to one or several effects of a compound as a result of tolerance developed to a pharmacologically similar compound.

cross-tolerance,

References in periodicals archive ?
Cross-tolerance associated with temperature and salinity stress during germination of barley seeds.
Response to temperature stress of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes in cross-tolerance of barley seed germination.
As mentioned earlier, acclimation to some stresses has also been found to provide cross-tolerance to other stresses.
Alternatively, cross-tolerance between the two drugs may reduce the drugs' aversive effects and motivate people to use more of the drugs in order to achieve the same rewarding effects.
The possibility that tolerance and cross-tolerance to the effects of alcohol and nicotine contribute to their co-use will be discussed, as will the evidence for a shared genetic predisposition to concurrently use or abuse alcohol and nicotine.
These mechanisms include genes that are involved in regulating certain brain chemical systems; neurobiological mechanisms, such as cross-tolerance and cross-sensitization to both drugs; conditioning mechanisms, in which cravings for alcohol or nicotine are elicited by certain environmental cues; and psychosocial factors (e.
Different opioids bind slightly differently to receptors, and incomplete cross-tolerance is common, she noted.
If confirmed in humans, this phenomenon, which is called cross-tolerance, may have important implications for the combined use of nicotine and alcohol in humans.