cross-sectional

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cross-sec·tion·al

(kros'sek'shŭn-ăl),
1. In histology, a sectioning of a tissue or organ perpendicular to its longitudinal axis.
2. Relating to planar sections of an anatomic or other structure.
See: synchronic.

cross-sectional

Etymology: L, crux + secare, to cut
(in statistics) pertaining to the sampling of a defined population at one point in time, performed in a nonexperimental research design. Compare longitudinal.

cross-sec·tion·al

(kraws sekshŭn-ăl)
Relating to planar sections of an anatomic or other structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study also cross-sectionally explored the relationship among the predictors.
To measure intertemporal changes in capital input, State-level, year-to-year changes in net fixed assets were deflated by cross-sectional and intertemporal capital price indexes to put them in cross-sectionally adjusted 1980 dollars; they were then cumulatively added to the 1980 base.
2012) found that among 6- to 19-year-olds participating in NHANES, increasing urinary BPA concentrations were cross-sectionally associated with increased BMI z-score and increased odds of obesity.
WHY TRANSNATIONAL TERRORIST ACTIVITIES ARE CROSS-SECTIONALLY CORRELATED
As shown in Table 1, the null hypothesis that unemployment innovations are cross-sectionally independent is strongly rejected for both the panel of U.
To date, many of these studies examining the relationship between depression and IFN-[alpha] treatment have been cross-sectionally designed or based on the depressive symptom rating scale.
Research: Researchers studied whether habitual cocoa intake was cross-sectionally related to blood pressure and prospectively related with cardiovascular mortality.
In the present study, to further examine the role of GGT in relation to oxidative stress, we investigated the association between serum carotenoids and tocopherols, which have known antioxidant properties, and serum GGT concentrations both cross-sectionally and longitudinally.
One limitation of the data, the authors note, is that they were collected cross-sectionally, so it is not possible to determine when a woman had her procedure and how much her characteristics have changed since that time.
Women with none of these roles had the greatest number of alcohol-dependence symptoms and other alcohol-related problems, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally.
It is found that price limit rates of stocks on the ISE vary cross-sectionally according to stock price levels and that it is possible to control for other factors besides price limits in examining effects of price limits on stock price volatility.
First, our sample was collected cross-sectionally without known dates of infection.