cross-immunity

cross-immunity

a form of immunity in which immunity to one bacteria or virus is effective in protecting the animal against an antigenically similar but different organism, e.g. protection of cattle against bacillary hemoglobinuria (Clostridium haemolyticum) by vaccination against black disease (C. novyi) and measles virus vaccine used to immunize dogs against canine distemper. See also heterotypic vaccine.
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Studies on cross-immunity and field trials with cell culture vaccine against bovine tropical theileriosis.
stated that cross-immunity exists between tuberculosis and leprosy, as BCG vaccination provides 20-91% protection against leprosy.
Despite partial cross-immunity between the two species, dual mycobacterial infection can occur.
As the vaccine is able to recognise and kill a strain that differs from the strain for which it was initially formulated, the flu vaccine can provide a significant level of cross-immunity.
Individuals acquire permanent immunity to each strain that infects them, but there is no evidence of cross-immunity.
Although the current vaccine does not contain the Fujian variant, animal studies and past experience with variant strains suggest that cross-immunity will occur, but at a lower rate.
Experimental evidence indicates that immunization with one Salmonella serovar can generate cross-immunity against a second serovar if both organisms have the same immunodominant O-antigen on their cell surface (17-19).
Gallinarum have strong cross-immunity against colonization with S.
The study also investigated the ability of the vaccine to induce cross-immunity against divergent H5N1 strains.
cross-immunity model, relies on the reproductive number of TB always being greater than that of leprosy.
The smallpox vaccine uses live virus to give cross-immunity.
There are four major serotypes of dengue circulating in the world; infection with one serotype does not provide cross-immunity to another.