cross-examination


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Related to cross-examination: direct examination

cross-examination

(kros′ĕg-zam″ĭ-nā′shŏn)
The interrogation of a witness by the opposing party in a legal dispute.
cross-examine (-zam′ĭn)

cross-examination,

n the questioning of a witness by the party against whom he or she has been called and examined.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also see the article "Seven Tips for Surviving Cross-Examination," FVS News, August 6,2014, available at tinyurl.
bring up circumstances that refute unfavorable inferences raised on cross-examination.
To be able to deliver a portion of closing argument during cross-examination, an advocate must exercise extraordinary control over the witness.
The Fourth District Court of Appeal held that the hearsay statements were testimonial and that two prior defense depositions of the alleged child victim were insufficient to satisfy the cross-examination requirement of Crawford.
Overall, two strong points of the book emerge: 1) a total of 37 excellent tips with examples spread throughout the book involving officers in court and 2) two appendices on cross-examinations that provide insight to officers and other witnesses as to what they may expect at a trial.
Counsel for the plaintiffs informed the court that his attempted cross-examination was not for the purpose of bringing Dr.
Cross-examination (cross) provides the opportunity in court to challenge an expert witness.
Davis is quite astute in her cross-examination of Stowe and the sources Stowe uses.
He examines the witnesses chosen by both side, the court battles, Bill Gates' failure during his cross-examination, and the many characters who crossed the stage.
The cross-examination of a 13-year-old girl for three hours over two days by the man accused of raping her has been a disturbing and distressing spectacle.
Microsoft attorney John Warden told Judge Jackson that he would complete his cross-examination of William Harris by the mid- morning recess today.
As early as 1896, the Appellate Division observed that cross-examination of experts from treatises was "the custom, in this state," and the court was "not aware of any well-founded objection to" such questioning.