critical

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crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl),
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

critical

/crit·i·cal/ (krit´ĭ-k'l)
1. pertaining to or of the nature of a crisis.
2. pertaining to a disease or other morbid condition in which there is danger of death.
3. in sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point, as a critical mass.

critical

(krĭt′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Relating to a medical crisis.
2. Being or relating to a grave physical condition especially of a patient.
3. Relating to the value of a measurement, such as temperature, at which an abrupt change in a chemical of physical quality, property, or state occurs.

crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl)
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl)
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

critical

1. a point at which one property or state changes to another property or state.
2. pertaining to a crisis in a disease.

critical care
care of a patient in a life-threatening situation of an illness. Includes artificial life support system.
critical care unit
see intensive care unit.
embryological critical period
the period during the life of the embryo, specific for each body system, during which organ genesis takes place.
critical distance
critical point drying
the technique used in preparing tissues for electron microscopy; to eliminate distortion due to surface tension.
critical temperature
the body temperature above which the animal is said to be fevered. See body temperature.

Patient discussion about critical

Q. what is the most critical period of pregnancy where i should be more aware? to the environment , diet ... and things like that...

A. The most critical, is unfortunately, the period with the highest chances of the pregnancy not to be noticed - the first weeks of the pregnancy. During the first eight weeks of pregnancy the various organs of the body develop most substantially, also called organogenesis. This is considered the most sensitive period. However, the fetus may be sensitive to insults during the whole pregnancy, so other periods are not "safe".

you may read more here (www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/birthdefects.html)

Q. when is the most critical time during the pregnancy period?

A. the most critical time is during the whole pregnantcy,the most critical time is the first trimester, but i say the whole pregnantcy is critical,

More discussions about critical
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants' mean ratings of peer group attentiveness, criticalness, and admiration, percentage correct on the statement recognition task, and percentage correct on the free recall task were each analyzed using a 4 (Age Group: Children, Early, Middle, and Late Adolescents) X 2 (Sex: Male, Female) X 3 (Conversation Type: Admiring, Critical, Nonattentive/Nonevaluative) X 2 (Target: Other, Self) mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA), with conversation type serving as a within-subjects factor.
Recall that in Study 1, the basis of the Age Group x Conversation Type interactions for ratings of admiration and criticalness had been the Admiring Conversation.
Six were the same as those assessing perceived admiration and criticalness in Studies 1 and 2; alpha coefficients were .
Zero-order correlations among participant age (treated here as a continuous variable), sex (coded as male = 1, female = 2), self-as-target score (which was created by subtracting the average target likelihood rating for the two peers from the target likelihood rating for self), perceived admiration, perceived criticalness, subscales of the AES and IAS, and the Global Self-Worth subscale of the Self-Perception Profile were examined (see Table 1).
Finally, self-as-target score was significantly correlated with perceived admiration and perceived criticalness, rs = .
That issue was clarified to some extent in Study 2, where significant age group differences in ratings of criticalness and admiration emerged only for the Nonattentive/Nonevaluative Conversation--the one that only briefly mentioned the target and in a nonevaluative way.
Knowledge of whom the peer group had mentioned did consistently relate to the criticalness and admiration ratings of the Nonattentive/Nonevaluative Conversation only in Study 2.
In Study 1, children and early adolescents (N = 264) rated the attentiveness, criticalness, and admiration expressed in three conversations, in which the subject or a peer was mentioned in either an admiring, critical, or nonevaluative manner.