critical organs


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critical organs

[krit′ikəl]
Etymology: Gk, krisis, turning point, organon, instrument
tissues that are the most sensitive to irradiation, such as the gonads, lymphoid organs, and intestine. The skin, cornea, oral cavity, esophagus, vagina, cervix, and optic lens are the second-most sensitive organs to irradiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the first rule of yoga and apart from burning fat, targets critical organs.
With the two systems -- CyberKnife and TomoTherapy -- in one location we truly have the flexibility to treat almost any patient who may benefit from radiation therapy, regardless of the size or location of the tumor(s), and proximity to critical organs.
These achievements have culminated in the ability to prescribe high dose, ablative RT to tumour targets anywhere in the body, while creating steep dose gradients that minimize damage to nearby critical organs.
Iva Tatounova, of the Proton Iva Tatounova, of the Proton Therapy Clinic, said: "It is targeted treatment so it doesn't irradiate critical organs and tissues that don't need it.
It automatically adjusts the beam for target movement, enabling reduced margins and minimizing radiation exposure to healthy tissue and critical organs.
9, but her critical organs -- heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas and small intestine -- could be used by others.
There, as they watched graphic slideshows of severe wounds to the brain and other critical organs, they learned about ways to treat war-wounded patients based on the experience of surgeons who have spent decades in war zones all over the world.
Brachytherapy is an important component of treatment that escalates the dose of radiation to the primary tumor while minimizing the dose to critical organs at risk.
The growing brain is protected at the expense of other, less critical organs, but how it happens was unknown until now.
Uncomplicated high blood pressure often causes no symptoms for many years, even decades, until it finally damages certain critical organs, Dr Pecker said.
Dr Pecker, who is a clinical medicine professor at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York (WCMC-NY) and attending physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, said that uncomplicated high blood pressure often causes no symptoms for many years, even for decades, when it could have finally damaged certain critical organs.

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