crisis theory


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crisis theory

a conceptual framework for defining and explaining the phenomena that occur when a person faces a problem that appears to be unsolvable. The theory is the basis of crisis therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Topics to be addressed include victimology, crisis theory and response, the criminal justice system, victims' rights, cultural awareness, as well as critical information about various crime types including homicide, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, drunk driving and vulnerable adult abuse.
Williams added that the midlife crisis theory has been creeping up on him for some time, as presently there are no pop stars left after the age of 40.
This book covers the different influences on crisis therapies and traces the development of crisis theory across its different phases.
The tenets of intervention under the crisis theory model include providing aid quickly; ensuring adequate, immediate, and long-term social support; and facilitating expression of feelings, symptoms, and worries.
More than thirty years ago, in a prescient article entitled 'The Politics of the Crisis Theory', Russell Jacoby (1975) cautioned against crisis theory's seductive appeal in Telos, a Frankfurt-inflected journal founded in part to combat the mechanistic Marxism from which many crisis theory permutations emerge.
Canada) began as a collection of essays published from the early 1970s onwards on discrete economic topics--neo-Ricardian theory, analytical Marxism, the falling rate of profit, crisis theory, monopoly capital, Paul Sweezy, advertising, and the capitalist state--but as he put it together he came to realize that there was a unifying theme running through them concerning the methodological project of Karl Marx, which he here aims to "rescue and retrieve" by also including five new essays describing it in relation to the other topics in the essays.
A few theories that frequently guide social work practice and conceptualize education as a valued intervention are described in the next sections and ego psychology, cognitive, behavioral, empowerment, and crisis theory.
Soederberg virtually ignores these debates, and it would be interesting to see what the implications for our understanding of global governance would be if alternative radical approaches to crisis theory and the theory of the state were developed and deployed in a manner analogous to the project undertaken here.
Most of the concepts of crisis theory supplement those from decision theory to provide a theoretical framework for the proposed model.
As a form of psychological first aid, it joined--and sometimes displaced--traditional crisis work, which had grown out of crisis theory elaborated in the 1960s.
For example, according to the bulletin, response team members should be trained in crisis theory, children's reactions to trauma, and classroom intervention approaches, among other topics.
Sparrow accepts the crisis theory of government growth but adds a "resource dependence" perspective drawn from the organizational theory of Jeffrey Pfeffer and Gerald Salancik (The External Control of Organizations: A Resource Dependence Perspective.