crime


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crime

Etymology: L, crimen
any act that violates a law and may have criminal intent.

crime

The act or intent (i.e., mens rea) of violating or breaking the law, or helping others to. Crimes are offences against society which may be punished by the state.

Patient discussion about crime

Q. Does anyone have information on Bipolar "blackouts" or know what they're really called? My boyfriend is bipolar and experienced a blackout a few weeks ago during which he did something completely out of character. A crime was committed and he has since been arrested. He's having trouble coping as he has no memory of the crime. He was on Wellbuterin and a doctor prescribed steroids and vicodin for a crushed disc. The chemicals may have led him into this blackout. He is a wonderful loving person and is now facing a life sentence for this terrible thing that happened that he had no conscious control over. They will not continue his medications in jail and he is not receiving mental or medical treatment. Is there anyone out there that can help me find some answers?

A. i never heard of such thing. but there are strange results sometimes from mixing drugs that affect the central nervous system. here is for instance a web page talking about interactions between Vicodin and Wellbutrin.

http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.php

More discussions about crime
References in classic literature ?
Whether the man personating a mechanic was, or was not, an accomplice in the crime, it is impossible to say.
Chance and genius give him the victory at Austerlitz; and by chance all men, not only the French but all Europe- except England which does not take part in the events about to happen- despite their former horror and detestation of his crimes, now recognize his authority, the title he has given himself, and his ideal of grandeur and glory, which seems excellent and reasonable to them all.
Deprived of power and authority, his crimes and his craft exposed, he should have appeared to them what he appeared ten years previously and one year later- an outlawed brigand.
Tell him next, that crimes cause their own detection.
I think Daddy Jacques did wrong to leave behind him the weapon with which the crime was committed and, as he occupied the attic immediately above Mademoiselle Stangerson's room, the builder's job ordered by the examining magistrate will give us the key of the enigma and it will not be long before we learn by what natural trap, or by what secret door, the old fellow was able to slip in and out, and return immediately to the laboratory to Monsieur Stangerson, without his absence being noticed.
This house was gloomy because it was remorseful: it was remorseful because it concealed a crime.
The author of the larger crime found himself thwarted by the smaller crime; the author of the smaller crime got the money.
Then the unhappy girl heard the people moving, the pikes clashing, and a freezing voice saying to her,--"Bohemian wench, on the day when it shall seem good to our lord the king, at the hour of noon, you will be taken in a tumbrel, in your shift, with bare feet, and a rope about your neck, before the grand portal of Notre-Dame, and you will there make an apology with a wax torch of the weight of two pounds in your hand, and thence you will be conducted to the Place de Grève, where you will be hanged and strangled on the town gibbet; and likewise your goat; and you will pay to the official three lions of gold, in reparation of the crimes by you committed and by you confessed, of sorcery and magic, debauchery and murder, upon the person of the Sieur Phoebus de Châteaupers.
From which it follows that, if society is normally organised, all crime will cease at once, since there will be nothing to protest against and all men will become righteous in one instant.
To kill the page was no crime -- it was her right; and upon her right she stood, serenely and unconscious of offense.
Since then men are guilty of the greatest crimes from ambition, and not from necessity, no one, for instance aims at being a tyrant to keep him from the cold, hence great honour is due to him who kills not a thief, but tyrant; so that polity which Phaleas establishes would only be salutary to prevent little crimes.
The Indictment concluded by declaring that, in the event of the offense charged against the prisoner being found proven by the Verdict, he, the said Eustace Macallan, "ought to be punished with the pains of the law, to deter others from committing like crimes in all time coming.