cricothyroidotomy


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cri·co·thy·rot·o·my

(krī'kō-thī-rot'ō-mē),
Incision through the skin and cricothyroid membrane for relief of respiratory obstruction; used before or in place of tracheotomy in certain emergency respiratory obstructions.
See also: coniotomy.
[cricoid + thyroid + G. tomē, incision]

minitracheostomy

A small-bore (e.g., 4 mm in diameter) percutaneous cricothyroidotomy device, which allows immediate and repeated aspiration of the tracheobronchial tree by minimally trained staff for effective management of sputum retention.

cricothyroidotomy

Coniotomy Emergency medicine An emergency procedure in which a passageway is created in the cricothyroid membrane–CTM by direct incision coupled with the insertion of a tracheostomy tube Cons ±Perichondritis with subsequent laryngeal stenosis; incision in CTM may cause permanent voice changes; cricothyroid arteries may cross the space and be a source of major bleeding

Cricothyroidotomy

An emergency tracheotomy that consists of a cut through the cricothyroid membrane to open the patient's airway as fast as possible.
Mentioned in: Tracheotomy

cri·co·thy·rot·o·my

, cricothyroidotomy (krī'kō-thī-rot'ŏ-mē, -thīroyd-otŏ-mē)
Incision through the skin and cricothyroid membrane for relief of respiratory obstruction; used before or in place of tracheotomy in certain emergency respiratory obstructions.
Synonym(s): intercricothyrotomy.
[cricoid + thyroid + G. tomē, incision]
References in periodicals archive ?
Two respondents stated inadequate access to cricothyroidotomy equipment and both worked predominantly in private institutions.
Recommended airway management for drowning victims includes mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, bag-valve-mask ventilation, endotracheal ventilation or an emergency airway adjunct such as a laryngeal mask, King Tube[R], Combitube[TM] or cricothyroidotomy (3).
Swift emergency management of laryngeal attacks can be life saving; airway management is paramount, and severely affected individuals may require urgent intubation or cricothyroidotomy.
Emergency cricothyroidotomy and tracheotomy with local anesthesia are the two most commonly used procedures for cases of severe trauma.
6%) could not be intubated and therefore underwent surgical cricothyroidotomy at the unit.
In this situation many difficult airway algorithms suggest emergency cricothyroidotomy as the final option (1,2).
Adrenaline may be helpful, but if there is a suspicion of airway compromise endotracheal intubation should be performed immediately and if unsuccessful an emergency cricothyroidotomy or tracheostomy should be performed.
Schwartz (8) argues that "It is prudent to have a surgeon skilled in performing a tracheotomy and a cricothyroidotomy standby" in the situation where intubation may not be achievable.
He had 2 cardiopulmonary arrests, and with assistance from a senior colleague, an emergency cricothyroidotomy was performed.
If the operating surgeon cannot be relied on to provide an emergency surgical airway, where does this leave the surgical airway component of current 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' algorithms, especially once a cannula cricothyroidotomy has failed (7,8)?
The accepted fall-back position for the "can't intubate, can't ventilate" situation is either cannula cricothyroidotomy or surgical cricothyroidotomy.
Cricothyroidotomy has been a well recognised technique for "can't ventilate and can't intubate scenario" (1).