cricoid cartilage


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cartilage

 [kahr´tĭ-lij]
a specialized, fibrous connective tissue present in adults, and forming most of the temporary skeleton in the embryo, providing a model in which most of the bones develop, and constituting an important part of the organism's growth mechanism; the three most important types are hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage. Also, a general term for a mass of such tissue in a particular site in the body.
 Involvement of joint and cartilage in osteoarthritis. From ARHP Arthritis Teaching Slide Collection, American College of Rheumatology.
alar c's the cartilages of the wings of the nose.
aortic cartilage the second costal cartilage on the right side.
arthrodial cartilage (articular cartilage) that lining the articular surfaces of synovial joints.
arytenoid c's two pyramid-shaped cartilages of the larynx.
connecting cartilage that connecting the surfaces of an immovable joint.
costal cartilage a bar of hyaline cartilage that attaches a rib to the sternum in the case of true ribs, or to the immediately above rib in the case of the upper false ribs.
cricoid cartilage a ringlike cartilage forming the lower and back part of the larynx.
diarthrodial cartilage articular cartilage.
elastic cartilage cartilage that is more opaque, flexible, and elastic than hyaline cartilage, and is further distinguished by its yellow color. The ground substance is penetrated in all directions by frequently branching fibers that give all of the reactions for elastin.
ensiform cartilage xiphoid process.
fibrous cartilage fibrocartilage.
floating cartilage a detached portion of semilunar cartilage in the knee joint.
hyaline cartilage flexible, somewhat elastic, semitransparent cartilage with an opalescent bluish tint, composed of a basophilic fibril-containing substance with cavities in which the chondrocytes occur.
 Hyaline cartilage. The matrix nearest the chondrocytes is intensely staining; although the matrix appears homogeneous, collagen fibrils may be visualized by polarized light or electron microscopy. From Dorland's, 2000.
Meckel's cartilage the ventral cartilage of the first branchial arch.
permanent cartilage cartilage that does not normally become ossified.
Reichert's cartilage the dorsal cartilage of the second branchial arch.
reticular cartilage elastic cartilage.
semilunar cartilage one of the two interarticular cartilages of the knee joint.
temporary cartilage cartilage that is normally destined to be replaced by bone.
thyroid cartilage the shield-shaped cartilage of the larynx, underlying the laryngeal prominence on the surface of the neck.
vomeronasal cartilage either of the two narrow strips of cartilage, one on each side, of the nasal septum supporting the vomeronasal organ.
yellow cartilage elastic cartilage.

cri·coid car·ti·lage

[TA]
the lowermost of the laryngeal cartilages; it is shaped like a signet ring, being expanded into a nearly quadrilateral plate (lamina) posteriorly; the anterior portion is called the arch (arcus).

cricoid cartilage

a ring-shaped cartilage of the larynx, consisting of a narrow anterior arch and a posterior wide quadrilateral lamina, connected to the thyroid cartilage by the cricothyroid ligament at the level of the sixth cervical vertebra.
enlarge picture
Cricoid cartilage

cri·coid car·ti·lage

(krī'koyd kahr'ti-lăj) [TA]
The lowermost of the laryngeal cartilages. It is shaped like a signet ring, being expanded into a nearly quadrilateral plate (lamina) posteriorly; the anterior portion is called the arch (arcus).
Synonym(s): cartilago cricoidea [TA] .

cri·coid car·ti·lage

(krī'koyd kahr'ti-lăj) [TA]
The lowermost of the laryngeal cartilages. It is shaped like a signet ring.

cartilage

a specialized, gristly connective tissue present in both mature animals and embryos, providing a model in which most of the bones develop, and constituting an important part of the organism's growth mechanism; the three most important types are hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Also, a general term for a mass of such tissue in a particular site in the body.

alar c's
the cartilages of the wings of the nose.
annular ear cartilage
a ring of cartilage interposed between the rolled-up auricular cartilage and the skull.
arthrodial cartilage, articular cartilage
that clothing the articular surfaces of synovial joints.
arytenoid c's
two pyramid-shaped cartilages of the larynx.
auricular cartilage
cartilage of the pinna and much of the external ear canal.
cartilage canals
tunnels containing blood vessels incorporated in developing cartilage.
connecting cartilage
that connecting the surfaces of an immovable joint.
costal cartilage
a bar of hyaline cartilage that attaches a rib to the sternum in the case of true ribs, or to the immediately cranial rib in the case of the anterior false ribs.
cricoid cartilage
a ringlike cartilage forming the caudal part of the larynx.
diarthrodial cartilage
articular cartilage.
distal phalangeal cartilage
the ungual cartilages of the third phalanx in the horse lie mostly against the hoof wall but can be palpated if ossified. See also sidebone.
elastic cartilage
cartilage that is more opaque, flexible and elastic than hyaline cartilage, and is further distinguished by its yellow color. The ground substance is penetrated in all directions by frequently branching fibers that give all of the reactions for elastin.
cartilage emboli
see fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy.
ensiform cartilage
xiphoid process.
fibrous cartilage
fibrocartilage.
floating cartilage
a detached portion of semilunar cartilage in the stifle joint.
hoof cartilage
see distal phalangeal cartilage (above).
hyaline cartilage
flexible, somewhat elastic, semitransparent cartilage with an opalescent bluish tint, composed of a basophilic fibril-containing substance with cavities in which the chondrocytes occur.
interarytenoid cartilage
an occasional cartilage located between the two arytenoid cartilages.
nasal cartilage
rostral end to the internasal septum, separating the nasal cavities and anchoring the other cartilages around the nostrils.
parapatellar cartilage
cartilaginous plates medial and lateral to the patella in some species, e.g. dogs.
permanent cartilage
cartilage that does not normally become ossified.
retained enchondral cartilage cores
occur in ulnar metaphysis and lateral femoral condyles of young, giant breed dogs. Visible radiographically as radiolucent inverted cones, extending into the metaphysis, they are often associated with growth deformities such as forelimb valgus and genu valgum.
reticular cartilage
elastic cartilage.
scapular cartilage
dorsal extension of the scapula in ungulates; tends to calcify with age.
cartilage scissors
used for ear cropping in dogs.
semilunar cartilage
one of the two intra-articular cartilages of the stifle joint.
temporary cartilage
cartilage that is normally destined to be replaced by bone.
thyroid cartilage
the unpaired cartilage of the larynx to which the vocal folds attach.
tibial cartilage
the bed of cartilage located on the caudal surface of the intertarsal joint of birds; the tendons of the digital flexors pass through it.
ungual cartilage
see distal phalangeal cartilage (above).
vomeronasal cartilage
either of the two narrow strips of cartilage, one on each side, of the nasal septum supporting the vomeronasal organ.
xiphoid cartilage
posterior continuation of the sternum; supports the anterior abdominal wall, especially the linea alba.
yellow cartilage
elastic cartilage.

cricoid

1. ring-shaped.
2. the cricoid cartilage.

cricoid cartilage
a ringlike cartilage at the caudal part of the larynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intraoperatively, the cricoid cartilage was found to have fractured into several pieces, which were uniformly soft and without calcifications.
The thyroid and cricoid cartilages can fracture, buckle and dislocate with respect to each other (Figure 4) Paraglottic hemorrhage and/or edema as well as abnormal endolaryngeal contour or configuration are findings at CT that often accompany cartilage injuries (Figure 4) In newer management paradigms, laryngeal cartilage fractures are surgical lesions, reduced and fixed with adaptation plating to restore the skeletal anatomy necessary for proper phonation (Figure 5).
A hypoechoic structure between the thyroid and the cricoid cartilages can be observed through a longitudinal section along the larynx (Fig.
The debate relating to the amount of pressure applied to the cricoid cartilage is mainly due to one of the complications of cricoid pressure which is the rupture of the oesophagus.
Unlike the other reported cases, the growth pattern was polypoid and showed no evidence of connection to the cricoid cartilage.
The subglottic region, especially the anterior surface of the posterior lamina of the cricoid cartilage.
Pressure applied by the healthcare staff on a cricoid cartilage simulator during Sellick's maneuver in rapid sequence intubation
Smith et al (2003) acknowledges that the cricoid cartilage is the only complete ring in the trachea and applying pressure at this point compresses and occludes the oesophagus at the C5 - C6 level.
Injury to the cricoid cartilage can cause scarring, with subsequent subglottic stenosis.
Initial inspection of the neck suggested that tracheostomy would be difficult as he had a short neck with very little space between the cricoid cartilage and the manubrium.
The narrowest portion of the digestive tract, the esophagus originates at the inferior border of the cricoid cartilage at a level between the fifth and sixth cervical vertebrae (C5-6).
It is an application of pressure on cricoid cartilage ring against the body of C5 cervical vertebra which obliterate the oesophageal opening.