cricoarytenoid


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cricoarytenoid

 [kri″ko-ar″ĭ-te´noid]
pertaining to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.

cri·co·ar·y·te·noid

(krī'kō-ar'i-tē'noyd),
Relating to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.

cri·co·ar·y·te·noid

(krī'kō-ar-i-tē'noyd)
Relating to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.

cricoarytenoid

pertaining to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.

cricoarytenoid muscle
see Table 13.1E.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the epiglottis-posterior hypopharyngeal wall distance was narrowed, and the inferior constructor muscle and posterior cricoarytenoid muscle were compressed due to osteophytes on the left side.
Endoscopic arytenoid reduction was performed along with chemical tenotomy of the posterior cricoarytenoid using 10 units of botulinum toxin.
In addition, phonation prior to imaging can result in symmetric activity in the larynx, involving the vocal cords and posterior cricoarytenoid muscles; jaw clenching or chewing prior to imaging can show activation of muscles of mastication (8); and insulin administration or a nonfasting state can cause diffuse skeletal muscle uptake since insulin drives glucose (and FDG) into skeletal muscles (9) (Figure 3).
Assessment of posterior cricoarytenoid botulinum toxin injections in patients with abductor spasmodic dysphonia.
It refers to partial displacement of the arytenoid within the cricoarytenoid joint, as distinct from arytenoid dislocation, which is complete separation of the arytenoid cartilage from the joint space.
Virtopsy hemorrhage of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle by blunt force to the neck in postmortem multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.
6,9,12,13) A typical finding is symmetric high uptake at the muscle origin and insertion of the arytenoid cartilage, posterior cricoarytenoid muscles, and some less intense uptake along the course of thyroarytenoid and vocalis muscle (11) (Figure 1).
5-cm sliver of steel had become impacted in the right cricoarytenoid joint, which made the arytenoid cartilage unable to rotate.
Distraction techniques and relaxed throat breathing techniques, such as asking the patient to pant (which activates the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle, the main vocal cord abductor), or placing the tongue on the floor of the mouth and breathing through pursed lips may alleviate an attack.
Recently, it has also been discovered that atrophy of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle, an intrinsic muscle of the larynx, occurs with vocal cord paralysis (5).
Vocal fold paralysis results from a nonfunctioning recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), whereas vocal fold fixation usually is caused by fibrosis or dislocation of the cricoarytenoid (CA) joint.
The muscles most involved in laryngospasm are the lateral cricoarytenoid and the thyroarytenoid (adductors of the glottis) and the cricothyroid (a tensor of the vocal cords) (9).