crevice


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Related to crevice: Crevice corrosion

crevice

 [krev´is]
a fissure.
gingival crevice the space between the cervical enamel of a tooth and the overlying unattached gingiva.

crev·ice

(krev'is),
A crack or small fissure, especially in a solid substance.
[Fr. crevasse]

crevice

/crev·ice/ (krev´is) fissure.
gingival crevice  the space between the cervical enamel of a tooth and the overlying unattached gingiva.

crevice

[krev′is]
a cleft or fissure, like that between the gum and the neck of a tooth.

crev·ice

(krev'is)
A crack or small fissure, especially in a solid substance.
[Fr. crevasse]

crev·ice

(krev'is)
A crack or small fissure, especially in a solid substance.
[Fr. crevasse]

crevice

a fissure.

gingival crevice
the space between the cervical enamel of a tooth and the overlying unattached gingiva.
References in classic literature ?
In the Parvis, some good women, who had their milk jugs in their hands, were pointing out to each other, with astonishment, the singular dilapidation of the great door of Notre-Dame, and the two solidified streams of lead in the crevices of the stone.
High up the bluff we climbed, higher than all the other caves, to a tiny crevice that could not be seen from the ground.
Graspus), which inhabits the crevices of the rock, stole the fish from the side of the nest, as soon as we had disturbed the parent birds.
He burrowed in crevices and corners, and found corks and cigarettes.
When it was opened, a crevice was opened between the door and the post.
The very sunlight looks desolation, falling through the thick-blossoming apple-trees as through the chinks and crevices of deserted Egyptian cities.
But instead of the darkness, and the thick and mephitic atmosphere he had expected to find, Dantes saw a dim and bluish light, which, as well as the air, entered, not merely by the aperture he had just formed, but by the interstices and crevices of the rock which were visible from without, and through which he could distinguish the blue sky and the waving branches of the evergreen oaks, and the tendrils of the creepers that grew from the rocks.
Barren sun-dried patches, and little holes and crevices opened here and there by the action of the summer heat, announced that the lawn, like everything else at the farm, had been neglected, in the exclusive attention paid to the claims of the horses.
By way of ornament to the dull brown walls, icicles appear in the crevices of the timber, gleaming at intervals in the red fire-light.
Under his rule are many thousands of the Nomes, who are queerly shaped but powerful sprites that labor at the furnaces and forges of their king, making gold and silver and other metals which they conceal in the crevices of the rocks, so that those living upon the earth's surface can only find them with great difficulty.
Wollaston have communicated to me a remarkable fact bearing on this subject; namely, that Madeira and the adjoining islet of Porto Santo possess many distinct but representative land-shells, some of which live in crevices of stone; and although large quantities of stone are annually transported from Porto Santo to Madeira, yet this latter island has not become colonised by the Porto Santo species: nevertheless both islands have been colonised by some European land-shells, which no doubt had some advantage over the indigenous species.
Around the nicest green meads, where the deer were playing in the grass, grew magnificent oaks and beeches; and if the bark of one of the trees was cracked, there grass and long creeping plants grew in the crevices.