creosote


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to creosote: creosote bush

creosote

 [kre´o-sōt]
a mixture of phenols from wood tar, formerly used as an expectorant and external antiseptic and now mainly used as a wood preservative. A mixture of the carbonates of various constituents of creosote (creosote carbonate) is used as an expectorant and antiseptic.

cre·o·sote

(krē'ō-sōt),
A mixture of phenols (chiefly methyl guaiacol, guaiacol, and creosol) obtained during the distillation of wood-tar, preferably that derived from beechwood; used as a disinfectant and wood preservative.
[G. kreas, flesh, + sōtēr, preserver]

creosote

(krē′ə-sōt′)
n.
1. A colorless to yellowish oily liquid containing phenols and creosols, obtained by the destructive distillation of wood tar, especially from the wood of a beech, and formerly used as an expectorant in treating chronic bronchitis.
2. A yellowish to greenish-brown oily liquid containing phenols and creosols, obtained from coal tar and used as a wood preservative and disinfectant. It can cause severe neurological disturbances if inhaled in strong concentrations.
tr.v. creo·soted, creo·soting, creo·sotes
To treat or paint with creosote.

creosote

[krē′əsōt]
a flammable oily liquid with a smoky odor that is used primarily as a wood preservative. It can cause a wide variety of health problems, ranging from cancer and corneal damage to convulsions, dermatitis, and vertigo. Persons who work with treated wood are usually at the greatest risk of exposure. See also phenol poisoning.

cre·o·sote

(krēŏ-sōt)
A mixture of phenols (chiefly methyl guaiacol, guaiacol, and creosol) obtained during the distillation of wood-tar, preferably that derived from beechwood; used as a disinfectant and wood preservative.
[G. kreas, flesh, + sōtēr, preserver]

creosote (krēˑ· sōt),

n a colorless to yellowish, oily liquid obtained by distilling wood tar, particularly
Fagus sylvatica; used as wood preservative; harmful to animals because they may develop skin irritation by chewing on wood treated with creosote.

cre·o·sote

(krēŏ-sōt)
A mixture of phenols obtained during distillation of wood-tar; used as a disinfectant.
[G. kreas, flesh, + sōtēr, preserver]

creosote

a mixture of phenols from wood tar; used externally as an antiseptic and internally in chronic bronchitis as an expectorant. A mixture of the carbonates of various constituents of creosote (creosote carbonate) is used the same as the base.

creosote-treated timber
treating timber with creosote is a common method of preservation. Use of the timber for housing while it is still wet may cause poisoning especially in young pigs. There may be local burning of the skin, oral, esophageal and gastric erosion, or degeneration of parenchymatous organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The herbicide Tebuthiuron has been used to control creosote bush and juniper since the 1980s, and the benefits of its application are well documented.
The test plot contains CCA, creosote, pentachlorophenol, and ACA preservative treatments.
A search on the Internet or a visit to the school library can shed some light on understanding how creosote is applied.
According to EPA records, no creosote was used after 1946.
King Creosote and Jon Hopkins play at the Capstone Theatre in February 7.
The use of creosote by the general public has been banned since 2003.
It's like a Fence Lollapalooza with Jeremy Radway from The Player Piano, Pictish and the King Creosote Band all squeezed into a Vauxhall," he says with a smile, referring to the legendary US touring rock festival.
KNOWN to his mum as Kenny Anderson, King Creosote has been plying his folk/ electronica trade for more than a decade.
And they came up with fencing timber that's been pressure treated with creosote.
But most of the sleepers are soaked in Creosote, a chemical linked with cancer.
The Prime Desert Woodlands contains such desert flora as Joshua trees, California junipers and creosote bushes on about 100 acres at Avenue K-8 and 35th Street West.
Creosote is formed when the smoke and gas from burning solid fuels condense on a chimney, creating a black, crusty build-up.