imagery

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imagery

 [im´ij-re]
1. a group of images or mental pictures.
2. the use of images to describe something.
simple guided imagery in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful use of imagination to achieve relaxation and/or direct attention away from undesirable sensations.

im·age·ry

(im'ăj-rē),
A technique in behavior therapy in which the client or patient is conditioned to substitute pleasant fantasies to counter the unpleasant feelings associated with anxiety.

imagery

/im·age·ry/ (im´aj-re)
1. the formation of a mental representation of something perceived by the senses.
2. any of a number of therapeutic techniques that use the formation of such representations to elicit changes in attitudes, behaviors, or physiologic reactions.

guided imagery  a therapeutic technique in which the patient enters a relaxed state and focuses on an image related to the issue being confronted, which the therapist uses as the basis of an interactive dialogue to help resolve the issue.

imagery

(ĭm′ĭj-rē)
n. pl. image·ries
Psychology A technique in behavior therapy in which the patient uses pleasant fantasies to relax and counteract anxiety.

imagery

[im′ijrē]
Etymology: L, imago
(in psychiatry) the formation of mental concepts, figures, or ideas; any product of the imagination. An imagery technique is applied therapeutically to decrease anxiety. See also guided imagery.

imagery

Alternative medicine
A therapeutic format in which the power of the mind is used to evoke a positive physical response so as to reduce stress, slow the heart rate, stimulate the immune system and reduce pain. Imagery consists of the creation of positive thoughts and images and communicating them with the body as a means of healing a diseased organ or tissue; it is believed to act on the psychoneuroimmune system by placing the power of the mind over physical ailment.

Anecdotal reports suggest that imaging may be effective for allergies, cancer, chronic pain, control of habits, dysmenorrhoea, headaches, hypertension, enhancing the immune system, performance anxiety (stage fright), premenstrual syndrome, stress-related GI symptoms, recuperation from surgery and urinary incontinence.

imagery

Psychology The evoking of a visual, audio, or other internalized mental image, that retains the 'flavor' and sensory qualities of an original external stimulus; a technique in which a person focuses on positive mental images. See Chemical imagery, Fictive imagery, Guided imagery, Hypnagogic imagery, Interactive guided imagery, Memory imagery, Perceptual imagery, Relaxing imagery.

im·ag·e·ry

(im'ăj-rē)
A technique in behavior therapy in which the client or patient is conditioned to substitute pleasant fantasies to counter the unpleasant feelings associated with anxiety.

imagery

the process of forming symbolic mental representations of objects, events or actions, which may be in any of the sensory modes. In sport psychology the effective and deliberate use of imagery is considered to be one of the fundamental mental skills for sports performers and is used for mental rehearsal, motivation, relaxation and stress management. external imagery is that engaged in from a third person perspective as if an external observer were watching the person doing the imaging; internal imagery is that engaged in from the first-person perspective of the person doing the imaging. In kinaesthetic imagery the person images bodily movements or sensations. In visual imagery the person creates a mental picture of an object, event or action, also known as visualization. See also psychoneuromuscular theory.

imagery

1. Process of recalling past visual experiences. 2. Synonym for visualization. See visual image.
References in periodicals archive ?
With practice as your actions follow suit, says creative visualisation guru Rachel Charles, your relationships will improve, you will be able to achieve your goals and you can send healing messages to your body.
University of Teesside students Matt Sibley, 22, from Stockton-on-Tees, studied the BSc (Hons) Computer Animation degree, while both Richard Himsworth, 24, from Loftus, and Sara Waters, 24, from Middlesbrough, studied the BSc (Hons) Creative Visualisation course.
The 23-year-old who is now studying for an MA at Teesside University after graduating in Creative Visualisation, won the prize for his creativity, self-development and motivation to learn new technologies while working on projects with UK Haptics, which included designing the company's new corporate branding.
Youngest brother Peter, 21, from Hemlington, has a BA(Hons) in Creative Visualisation and is studying for a Masters.
Sara and Richard are studying BA Hons in creative visualisation and Matt is studying BA Hons in computer animation.
Phil Shoebottom is now a senior lead artist at Realtime UK, having graduated from the university's creative visualisations course in 2003.