creationism

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creationism

(krē-ā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Belief in the supernatural origin of the universe or of humans and other living things, especially as based on the literal interpretation of the account of the creation related in the Bible.

cre·a′tion·ist adj. & n.

creationism

Evolutionary biology
A philosophy based on the Judeo-Christian concept that all forms of life, in particular human life, were created from nothing (by God). Creationism is the virtual opposite of Darwinism or evolution, in which all organisms are believed to have evolved from another.

creationism

The belief that the account of the creation of the world contained in the first chapter of the book of Genesis is literally true. The implication, often expressed, is that the scientific account, including the geological evidence, is false. Creationism denies Darwinian evolution, but a belief in, and knowledge of, evolution has become an essential component in the mental armamentarium of the medical scientist. (See EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE.)

creationism

an old-fashioned and outdated doctrine that each species of organism arose in an independent fashion by special creation. Such views have now been largely replaced by evolutionary theory but are still held by some on religious grounds.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An official at the museum admitted that he presents creationist teachings, such as the idea that all animal species appeared at once, and dives directly into the religious foundations for those teachings in response to student questions.
In short, even though the adherence to the creationist view has not changed over time, familiarity with the term "creationism" has diminished.
Cargill herself has drawn accusations of improper involvement in the review process from the Texas Freedom Network, a group that monitors religious influence in public schools, after reports that she encouraged creationists on the panels.
As such, the book produces a very readable description of what "we" look like to scientists who do not have a faith in God; whether "we" are young earth creationists (YEC), intelligent design (ID) proponents, or theistic evolutionists (or anything between).
These teachers fail to explain the nature of scientific inquiry, undermine the authority of established experts, and legitimize creationist arguments, even if unintentionally;' wrote Berkman and Plutzer.
To beat the sophistry of the creationists requires a high degree of cleverness indeed.
Darwin was self-critical (as a good scientist should be) and it is certainly possible, by quoting carefully selected passages out of context, to give the impression that he had 'grave doubts' about evolution: but the dishonesty of such tactics serves merely to underline the weakness of creationist arguments.
Since the courts have blocked teaching of creationist ideology in public schools (in the case of Kitzmiller vs.
A creationist claims there is no such thing as evolution and believes in the literal truth of the Book of Genesis.
They say that "there is no guarantee" that creationist research will lead to viable explanations that can withstand rigorous scrutiny.
He added science teachers must treat pupils who have creationist beliefs with respect.
Once that has been achieved, then, presumably, material once off-limits could again make it through the gates: little-known theories that supposedly undermine evolution, for instance, or natural wonders supposedly too miraculous for evolution to explain (like the human eye, an ever-popular creationist example), or instances of disagreement about specific evolutionary mechanisms that would be magnified and presented as evidence against the theory itself.