creatine


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Related to creatine: creatinine

creatine

 [kre´ah-tin]
a nonprotein substance synthesized in the body from three amino acids: arginine, glycine (aminoacetic acid), and methionine. Creatine readily combines with phosphate to form phosphocreatine, or creatine phosphate, which is present in muscle, where it serves as the storage form of high-energy phosphate necessary for muscle contraction.
creatine kinase an enzyme catalyzing the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphocreatine to ATP. It has three isoenzymes: CK1, found primarily in the brain; CK2, found in the myocardium; and CK3, found in both skeletal muscle and the myocardium. The presence of CK2 in the blood is strongly indicative of a recent myocardial infarction; it is present until about 72 hours after the attack.

cre·a·tine

(krē'ă-tēn, -tin), Do not confue this word with creatinine.
A compound, N-(aminoiminomethyl)-N-methylglycine, which occurs in urine, sometimes simply as creatine, but generally as creatinine, and in muscle, generally as phosphocreatine. Elevated levels are found in the urine of individuals with muscular dystrophy.

creatine

/cre·a·tine/ (kre´ah-tin) an amino acid occurring in vertebrate tissues, particularly in muscle; phosphorylated creatine is an important storage form of high-energy phosphate.
creatine phosphate  phosphocreatine.

creatine

(krē′ə-tēn′, -tĭn) also

creatin

(-tĭn)
n.
A compound, C4H9N3O2, that is found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates mainly in the form of phosphocreatine and that is involved in storing and supplying energy for muscle contraction.

creatine

[krē′ətēn, -tin]
Etymology: Gk, kreas, flesh
an important nitrogenous compound produced by metabolic processes in the body. Combined with phosphorus, it forms a high-energy phosphate. In normal metabolic reactions the phosphorus is transferred to a molecule of adenosine diphosphate to produce a molecule of very high-energy adenosine triphosphate. See also creatinine.

cre·a·tine

(krē'ă-tin)
N-(aminoiminomethyl) - N-methylglycine; occurs in urine, sometimes as such, but generally as creatinine, and in muscle, generally as phosphocreatine; elevated in urine in muscular dystrophy; synthesized in liver and pancreas from amino acids; absorbed in bloodstream, it is deposited in tissue (e.g., muscles, brain).

creatine

A nitrogenous substance present in all muscle cells.

creatine

a white nitrogenous substance found in vertebrate muscles.

creatine (krēˑ··tīn),

n an amino acid that is created in the body in the kidneys, liver, and pancreas. Used as a supplement by athletes to aid in performance. Not for use by pregnant or nursing women, children, or patients with kidney or heart disease.

creatine

a nonprotein nitrogen substance synthesized in the body from three amino acids: arginine, glycine (aminoacetic acid) and methionine. Creatine readily combines with phosphate to form phosphocreatine, or creatine phosphate, which is present in muscle, where it serves as the storage form of high-energy phosphate necessary for intense muscle contraction.

creatine kinase (CK)
an organ-specific enzyme catalyzing the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphocreatine to ATP. It has three isoenzymes: CK1, found primarily in the brain; CK2, found in the myocardium; and CK3, found in both skeletal muscle and the myocardium. In humans, the presence of CK2 in the blood is useful in diagnosing a recent myocardial infarction, but in animals CK3 is most commonly increased related to muscle damage. Called also creatine phosphokinase, Lohmann's enzyme.
creatine phosphate
see creatine (above).
creatine phosphokinase
called also CPK; see creatine kinase (above).

Patient discussion about creatine

Q. Q. I want to know about urine protein creatine ratio in diagnosing nephrotic syndrome. Please explain interms of unit such as mg/mg or mmol/mg. Normal range, nephrotic range with good referrence.

A. Nephrotic syndrome is defines as a damage to the kidneys, in which there is a leak of large amounts of protein (over 3.5 grams of protein / 24 hours urine output) from the blood to the urine. Protein loss causes low protein count in the blood (hypoalbuminemia) and edemas (excess fluid in the interstitial cavity which is between the cells, causes leg swelling most often, and also in the adbomen and around the eyes).

More discussions about creatine
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, supplementing with creatine helps restore the energy loss that is at the root of many age-related diseases.
Among the existing supplements, creatine and ginseng have attracted attention of many researchers and have pushed mind of investigators toward studying effects of this supplement on body composition, muscular power and physiological metabolisms [8].
They suggested that the damage induced by repeated eccentric contractions may have overwhelmed any protective mechanisms of creatine suggested by other research (eg.
And creatine helps prevent proteins from breaking down, which can help preserve bone.
Potential candidates for the creatine project have been taking levodopa or other drugs that increase dopamine levels In the brain for less than three years.
Which of the following statements is the most accurate advice about creatine monohydrate in the above situation?
44, and the level of creatine phosphokinase peaked at 251 762 U/L.
We adapted a previously reported method to measure GAA and creatine in plasma (4) for amniotic fluid.
Hass randomized 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease to progressive resistance weight training plus placebo, or training plus daily creatine supplementation with 20 g/day for the first 5 days and 5 g/day thereafter.
Pretty soon he asked his parents if he could use creatine, an amino acid that helps to build muscle mass.
The committee's concern was aroused by the case of Chris Miller, the football coach at South Eugene High School, who sold the muscle-builder creatine to some of his players.
Our patient met the criteria of T SS: she had fever, rash, desquamation, hypotension, vomiting, diarrhea, myalgias, elevated creatine kinase, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia.