creatine

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Related to creatin: Kreatin

creatine

 [kre´ah-tin]
a nonprotein substance synthesized in the body from three amino acids: arginine, glycine (aminoacetic acid), and methionine. Creatine readily combines with phosphate to form phosphocreatine, or creatine phosphate, which is present in muscle, where it serves as the storage form of high-energy phosphate necessary for muscle contraction.
creatine kinase an enzyme catalyzing the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphocreatine to ATP. It has three isoenzymes: CK1, found primarily in the brain; CK2, found in the myocardium; and CK3, found in both skeletal muscle and the myocardium. The presence of CK2 in the blood is strongly indicative of a recent myocardial infarction; it is present until about 72 hours after the attack.

cre·a·tine

(krē'ă-tēn, -tin), Do not confue this word with creatinine.
A compound, N-(aminoiminomethyl)-N-methylglycine, which occurs in urine, sometimes simply as creatine, but generally as creatinine, and in muscle, generally as phosphocreatine. Elevated levels are found in the urine of individuals with muscular dystrophy.

creatine

/cre·a·tine/ (kre´ah-tin) an amino acid occurring in vertebrate tissues, particularly in muscle; phosphorylated creatine is an important storage form of high-energy phosphate.
creatine phosphate  phosphocreatine.

creatine

(krē′ə-tēn′, -tĭn) also

creatin

(-tĭn)
n.
A compound, C4H9N3O2, that is found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates mainly in the form of phosphocreatine and that is involved in storing and supplying energy for muscle contraction.

creatine

[krē′ətēn, -tin]
Etymology: Gk, kreas, flesh
an important nitrogenous compound produced by metabolic processes in the body. Combined with phosphorus, it forms a high-energy phosphate. In normal metabolic reactions the phosphorus is transferred to a molecule of adenosine diphosphate to produce a molecule of very high-energy adenosine triphosphate. See also creatinine.

cre·a·tine

(krē'ă-tin)
N-(aminoiminomethyl) - N-methylglycine; occurs in urine, sometimes as such, but generally as creatinine, and in muscle, generally as phosphocreatine; elevated in urine in muscular dystrophy; synthesized in liver and pancreas from amino acids; absorbed in bloodstream, it is deposited in tissue (e.g., muscles, brain).

creatine

A nitrogenous substance present in all muscle cells.

creatine

a white nitrogenous substance found in vertebrate muscles.

creatine (krēˑ··tīn),

n an amino acid that is created in the body in the kidneys, liver, and pancreas. Used as a supplement by athletes to aid in performance. Not for use by pregnant or nursing women, children, or patients with kidney or heart disease.

creatine

a nonprotein nitrogen substance synthesized in the body from three amino acids: arginine, glycine (aminoacetic acid) and methionine. Creatine readily combines with phosphate to form phosphocreatine, or creatine phosphate, which is present in muscle, where it serves as the storage form of high-energy phosphate necessary for intense muscle contraction.

creatine kinase (CK)
an organ-specific enzyme catalyzing the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphocreatine to ATP. It has three isoenzymes: CK1, found primarily in the brain; CK2, found in the myocardium; and CK3, found in both skeletal muscle and the myocardium. In humans, the presence of CK2 in the blood is useful in diagnosing a recent myocardial infarction, but in animals CK3 is most commonly increased related to muscle damage. Called also creatine phosphokinase, Lohmann's enzyme.
creatine phosphate
see creatine (above).
creatine phosphokinase
called also CPK; see creatine kinase (above).

Patient discussion about creatine

Q. Q. I want to know about urine protein creatine ratio in diagnosing nephrotic syndrome. Please explain interms of unit such as mg/mg or mmol/mg. Normal range, nephrotic range with good referrence.

A. Nephrotic syndrome is defines as a damage to the kidneys, in which there is a leak of large amounts of protein (over 3.5 grams of protein / 24 hours urine output) from the blood to the urine. Protein loss causes low protein count in the blood (hypoalbuminemia) and edemas (excess fluid in the interstitial cavity which is between the cells, causes leg swelling most often, and also in the adbomen and around the eyes).

More discussions about creatine
References in periodicals archive ?
There was no correlation between the serum level of [beta]HCG an indicator of the amount of viable trophoblastic tissue and creatin kinase in present study (Table 5).
Evaluation of serum creatin kinase in ectopic pregnancy with refrence of tubal status and histopothology.
43 15 482 Table 5: Correlation between creatin kinase and Bhcg.
John Brewer, Head of Human Performance at the Lilleshall National Sports Centre, said: "I would take a strong guess that Creatin is used by a number of top soccer clubs.
Creatin is not a banned substance, but some sporting bodies treat it warily.
A player revealed: "The physio Gary Lewin comes around and gives out the Creatin powder every morning.
Creatin is a natural substance produced by the body.
Openly used by Arsenal and England, Creatin sparked a scandal in Italy after investigators linked it with those deaths over the last two decades.
Talking about Creatin, he said: "Since using Creatin 7000ES I have felt much stronger during the latter stages of my races and I have seen my strength increase in the weights room.
People keep throwing at me that the England players used Creatin, but the percentage of it that hurt people in the States were TWENTY TIMES the amount we gave the players.
You can achieve the same results with legal drugs such as Creatin.
David Seidler's script elegantly dissects the relationship between monarch and commoner, creatins g memorable exchanges that provide the film withhugelaughsanda strong emotional heartbeat.