crankcase-spool catheter

crankcase-spool catheter

[krangk′kās]
a special elastic catheter stored within a plastic spool to facilitate its insertion, especially for hyperalimentation. When fully inserted, the crankcase-spool catheter is usually lodged in the subclavian vein. The catheter is highly flexible, and each revolution of the spool feeds about 5 inches of the catheter into the vein involved. When the crankcase-spool catheter is fully inserted, a radiographic exposure is made of the insertion area to confirm its correct placement. The crankcase-spool catheter is less irritating than a regular catheter, allows greater limb movement, and minimizes the risk of thrombosis. It may, however, cause complications, such as occlusion, phlebitis, infection, and catheter sensitivity. Occlusion of the vein, a common risk, is usually countered by flushing the vein with dilute streptokinase.