craniopagus


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craniopagus

 [kra″ne-op´ah-gus]
conjoined twins that are joined at the skull.

cra·ni·op·a·gus

(krā-nē-op'ă-gus),
A type of conjoined twin united on any portion of the cranial vault or calvarium not involving the foramen magnum, skull base, face, or vertebrae. The juncture is rarely symmetric and may involve the entire head or only a portion and may include the meninges, venous sinuses, and the cerebral cortex. Infinite variations exist in both axial and rotational orientation. Type 1, twins are facing the same direction; type 2, twins are facing the opposite direction; type 3, twins are facing 90° from one another.
[cranio- + G. pagos, something fixed]

craniopagus

[krā′nē·op′əgəs]
Etymology: Gk, kranion + pagos, fixed
conjoined twins united at the heads. Fusion can occur at the frontal, occipital, or parietal region. Also called cephalopagus.

craniopagus

a double monster joined at the head; called also cephalopagus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three day-old female craniopagus conjoined twins scheduled at the Neurological Institute of Antioquia for plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head, the chest and the abdomen, using contrast for vein resonance.
Rebeca was only the eighth documented case in the world of craniopagus parasitic us.
In 1987, Carson led the surgical team that separated craniopagus twins, both of whom survived, and in 1997 he guided a team of South African physicians who successfully separated craniopagus twins.
Carson was the primary neurosurgeon among the 70-member medical team that successfully separated seven-month-old German craniopagus twin boys ("Siamese Twins").
It was a 28-hour procedure to separate type-2 vertical craniopagus [i.
The condition of conjoined twins at the heads is known as craniopagus.
It was the first time surgeons had tried to separate adult craniopagus twins -siblings who a reborn joined at thehead.
Dr Benjamin Carson of Maryland, one of the neurosurgeons taking part, has successfully separated three sets of craniopagus twins -siblings born joined at the head.
In the past 72 years there have been 31 attempts to separate craniopagus twins--siblings fused at the cranium, the eight bones that make up the skull.
Craniopagus - Latin for ``fixed at the head'' - occurs in just 2 percent of those conjoined twins.
Craniopagus expert Benjamin Carson says 30 attempts have been made to separate twins but only seven children have survived.