craniometry


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craniometry

 [kra″ne-om´ĕ-tre]
a branch of anthropometry, being the measurement of the dimensions and angles of a bony skull.

cra·ni·om·e·try

(krā'nē-om'ĕ-trē),
Measurement of the dry skull after removal of the soft parts and study of its topography.
[cranio- + G. metron, measure]

craniometry

/cra·ni·om·e·try/ (kra″ne-om´ah-tre) the scientific measurement of the dimensions of the bones of the skull and face.craniomet´ric

craniometry

(krā′nē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
Measurement of the skull to determine its characteristics as related to sex, race, or body type.

cra·ni·om·e·try

(krā'nē-om'ĕ-trē)
Measurement of the dry skull after removal of the soft parts and study of its topography.
[cranio- + G. metron, measure]
Enlarge picture
CRANIOMETRIC POINTS: These are the fixed points of the skull used in craniometry: 1) acanthion; 2) asterion; 3) basion; 4) bregma; 5) condylion; 6) coronion or koronion; 7) crotaphion; 8) dacryon; 9) entomion; 10) glabella or metopion; 11) gnathion; 12) gonion; 13) infradentale; 14) inion; 15) jugale; 6) koronion; 16) mastoidale; 10) metopion; 17) nasion; 18) obelion; 19) opisthion; 20) orbitale; 21) pogonion; 22) porion; 23) prosthion; 24) pterion; 25) rhinion; 26) sphenion; 27) stephanion; 28) symphysion; 29) zygion; 30) zygomaxillary point.

craniometry

(krā-nē-ŏm′ĕ-trē) [″ + metron, measure]
Study of the skull and measurement of its bones.
See: illustration

cra·ni·om·e·try

(krā'nē-om'ĕ-trē)
Measurement of the dry skull after removal of the soft parts and study of its topography.
[cranio- + G. metron, measure]

craniometry (krā´nēom´ətrē),

n the study of the measurements of the skull.

craniometry

a branch of morphometry, being the measurement of the dimensions and angles of a bony skull.
References in periodicals archive ?
Craniometry, the leading numerical science of biological determinism, was replaced by molecular anthropology, which used genetic evidence to map human lineages through genetic markers.
Craniometry had stipulated that a receding forehead indicated savageness; despite many counterexamples, a small brain case stood for limited intelligence (Gould 1981: 8298).
Since the anthropological community was already fragmenting over the validity of craniometry, temperate voices such as Manouvrier and Schrader encouraged the sociologists not to attribute too much to inherited brain size.
The SAP physicians were far more rigorously quantitative in their craniometry.
As for craniometry, Chris Stringer (Natural History Museum) has made extensive use of cranial vault measurements in his research (see, for example, Stringer 1992), and comments (pers.