cranial osteopathy


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Related to cranial osteopathy: Cranial Sacral therapy

cranial osteopathy

Osteopathic medicine
A form of alternative osteopathy developed by Dr William G Sutherland (1873–1954), who viewed life as pulsating contractions and expansions that he called the “breath of life”; according to Sutherland, a healthy craniosacral system pulsates at a rate of 6 to 15 times/minute, which is achieved throught therapy. In craniosacral therapy, bones of the skull and face are manipulated to facilitate the flow of the “living forces”, possibly by improving the flow of cerebrospinal fluid; the manipulation is believed to be effective in treating autism, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, ear infection, oedema, epilepsy, headache, hypertension, hypotension, mood disorders, recurrent infections, spinal cord injury, stroke, temporomandibular joint syndrome, stress, tension, tinnitus and other conditions. Cranial osteopathy has three approaches: meningeal, reflex and sutural (in which the sutures between the cranial bones are manipulated).

cranial osteopathy,

n an approach to treatment and healing that considers the whole patient, especially in regard to the motion, tissues, and fluids of the skull area. This is practiced by osteopathic physicians.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other mums tell me that cranial osteopathy treatments work well for colicky babies so I'm currently on a mission to track a practitioner down.
Cranial osteopathy, or gentle manipulation of the baby's head can help.
Cranial osteopathy, aromatherapy cushions and even Indian gemstone medicine are just some of the techniques mothers swear by.
Cranial osteopathy pinpoints the tiny joints that make up the skull.
But cranial osteopathy can help conditions such as glue ear, migraine, dizziness, the effects of difficult or prolonged deliveries in babies and children, as well as orthopaedic and spinal conditions.
Cranial osteopathy has developed from the discovery in the 1930s that small tolerances of movement exist within the human skull.
Mr Iannarelli, who has clinics in Edinburgh and Glasgow and sits on the General Osteopathic Council, added: "More and more people are turning to cranial osteopathy because it is a very subtle form of treatment -and some conditions aren't necessarily amenable to standard osteopathic treatment.