cruciate

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Related to cranial (anterior) cruciate ligament: ACL injury

cru·ci·ate

(krū'shē-āt, krū'shet),
Shaped like, or resembling, a cross.
[L. cruciatus]

cruciate

/cru·ci·ate/ (kroo´she-āt) cruciform.

cruciate

(kro͞o′shē-āt′)
adj.
1. Arranged in or forming a cross; cruciform.
2.
a. Overlapping or crossing, as the wings of some insects when at rest.
b. Shaped like a cross: the cruciate ligaments of the knee.

cru′ci·ate′ly adv.

cruciate

[kro̅o̅′shē·āt]
Etymology: L, crux, cross
shaped like a cross.

cru·ci·ate

(krū'shē-āt)
Shaped like, or resembling, a cross.
[L. cruciatus]

cruciate

Cross-shaped.

cruciate

cross-shaped

cruciate

shaped like a cross.

caudal (posterior) cruciate ligament
complements the cranial cruciate ligament in providing a major part of the stability of the stifle joint. It originates from the lateral aspect of the medial femoral condyle, passes caudally and distally to insert on the medial side of the popliteal notch (tibia). Rupture is rare, except in association with cranial cruciate rupture, and results from severe injuries to the joint.
cranial (anterior) cruciate ligament
part of the stifle joint, originates in a fossa on the caudal aspect of the medial side of the lateral femoral condyle. It runs cranially, medially and distally between the condyles of the femur to insert on the cranial intercondyloid area of the tibia. The ligament acts to limit cranial movement of the tibia relative to the femur, and when the joint is flexed to limit internal axial movement. Rupture of this ligament is common in dogs, causing lameness, often with joint effusion, and chronic arthritis. Surgical reconstruction or stabilization of the joint is recommended.
cruciate suture pattern
an interrupted cross mattress suture to close wounds that are under a lot of tension. The needle is inserted through the tissue, across the wound, then back through the tissue on the other side, across the wound on the outside and advancing the needle to the next suture site where a second stitch is made in the same manner as the first. The two ends are then tied across the wound so as to create the cross shape.
Enlarge picture
Interrupted cruciate suture pattern. By permission from Slatter D, Textbook of Small Animal Surgery, Saunders, 2002