cracked tooth syndrome


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cracked tooth syndrome

Etymology: ME, craken; AS, toth
a group of symptoms caused by the presence of a cracked tooth, including pain on pressure or application of cold, with pulpitis if untreated.
A toothache secondary to a tooth fracture, not associated with a cavity or periodontal disease
Aetiology Chewing or biting hard objects—e.g., hard candies, pencils, nuts, ice, unpopped popcorn kernels, etc.
Diagnosis Fracture seen by painting a special dye on tooth or by low-power light microscopy
Treatment Crown; if needed, root canal

crack·ed tooth syn·drome

(krakt tūth sin'drōm)
Transient acute pain that is difficult to locate and experienced occasionally while chewing. Usually a vertical crack or split in the tooth extends across a marginal ridge through the crown and into the root, involving the pulp. Cracked teeth may be identified using transilluminated light or disclosing dyes.

crack·ed tooth syn·drome

(krakt tūth sin'drōm)
Transient acute dental pain that is difficult to locate and is experienced occasionally while chewing. Usually a vertical crack or split in the tooth extends across a marginal ridge through the crown and into the root, involving the pulp. Cracked teeth may be identified by clinicians by using transilluminated light or disclosing dyes. Pain is usually perceived when palpated; under pressure the tooth segments move independently.

cracked tooth syndrome,

n a transient acute pain in a tooth experienced occasionally while chewing. Difficult to locate and reproduce. Likely to occur among individuals who crack nuts and crush ice with their teeth, and among popcorn eaters. Usually a vertical crack or split in the tooth extends across a marginal ridge through the crown and into the root, involving the pulp. Visible by transilluminated light or with the use of disclosing dyes.
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