cowpox


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Related to cowpox: cowpox vaccine

cowpox

 [kow´poks]
a mild pustular eruption affecting milk cows, usually confined to the udder and teats, caused by the vaccinia virus, and transmissible to humans. Edward Jenner, in the 18th century, discovered that cowpox could be transmitted to humans who milked or tended cattle, and also noted that persons who contracted it in this way seldom contracted smallpox. This discovery led to vaccination against smallpox.

cowpox

/cow·pox/ (kou´poks) a mild eruptive disease of milk cows, confined to the udder and teats, due to cowpox virus, and transmissible to humans.

cowpox

(kou′pŏks′)
n.
A mild contagious skin disease of cattle, usually affecting the udder, that is caused by a virus and characterized by the eruption of a pustular rash. When the virus is transmitted to humans, as by vaccination, it can confer immunity to smallpox. Also called vaccinia.

cowpox

[kou′poks]
Etymology: AS, cu + ME, pokkes
a mild infectious disease characterized by a pustular rash, caused by the vaccinia virus. Animals that carry the vaccinia virus are cows, cats, and rodents. Human cases are usually rare. Transmission to humans can occur during the milking of a cow with active lesions on the udder and teats, but the disease is usually transmitted by domesticated cats. Cowpox infection usually confers immunity to smallpox, because of the similarity of the variola and vaccinia viruses. Also called cat pox. See also smallpox, vaccinia.

cowpox

A mild disease of cows' udders and teats that can be transmitted to people, doing manual milking. It causes skin blisters and confers immunity against SMALLPOX-a somewhat academic consideration now that this disease has been eradicated. Jenner's observations on cowpox led to vaccination and the science of immunology. (Edward Jenner, 1749–1823, English physician).

cowpox

a benign, contagious disease of cows characterized by the appearance of pox lesions on the teat and udder skin. The causative virus is in the genus Orthopoxvirus. Typical lesions are a patch of erythema, then a papule, followed by a vesicle, then a pustule and finally a scab. The disease is transmissible to humans and is now rare.

cowpox virus
a poxvirus which is antigenically distinct from vaccinia virus and pseudocowpox virus. The characteristics of the virus are otherwise identical with the vaccinia virus. See also vaccinia.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's a theory that some of these could be used in combination as a sort of vaccine, a bit like how cowpox was used as a vaccine against smallpox.
He called his procedure vaccination--from vaccinia, the Latin word for cowpox.
He wondered if the illness, known as cowpox, somehow protected them.
These extracts show activity against vaccinia and cowpox by two different viral evaluations, demonstrating the reproducibility of the results.
Orthopoxviruses (family Poxviridae, genus Orthopox-virus) cause several zoonotic diseases worldwide, including diseases caused by monkeypox virus in Africa, cowpox virus mainly in Europe, and vaccinia virus (VACV) in South America and Asia (1).
POPULATION AT RISK British surgeon Edward Jenner launched the practice of vaccination in 1796 by using live, transmissible vaccinia or cowpox virus to protect his patients from closely related smallpox.
By observing local milkmaids, Jenner tested whether the general belief that cowpox sufferers were actually immune to smallpox was true.
Although the full story that went before can never be known, smallpox eradication became possible, and then inevitable, when Edward Jenner, using his clinical powers of observation over a 25-year period during the 18th century, became convinced that an infection with cowpox could protect against smallpox.
As for cowpox virus, horse and human may be infected from a common source, such as rodents, and not necessarily from each other.
Such cross-protection is the case with cowpox and smallpox, and a vaccine currently in use for Japanese encephalitis protects some animals against the closely related West Nile virus.
Smallpox was a serious problem in the 18th century, and Jenner had been impressed by the fact that people suffering an attack of cowpox, a relatively harmless disease that could be contracted from cattle, could not be contaminated by smallpox.
Related studies also indicated that the Hemopurifier was effective in removing other smallpox related viruses, including cowpox and mousepox.