Cowherd


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An annual herb, the seeds of which contain saponins; it is analgesic, astringent, expectorant, laxative, and a secretagogue. It has been used for abscesses, chronic cough, headaches, menstrual disorders, paraesthesias, poor lactation in nursing mothers, and strokes
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We don't spend that much time traveling, so that gives our staff more time to work with the athletes," says Cowherd.
Through the use of this poetic device, the two lovers are presented as stars in the sky in the first two lines, before the focus is shifted for the next four lines to the emotions and thoughts of the Weaving Maid, who is unable to concentrate on her work while she suffers through her forced separation from the Cowherd.
Since Ray County does not have a dietician, Cowherd jumps in to provide that type of information for her diabetic patients.
Four years post-promotion, Cowherd notes that business practices have become more professional: leaner -- without being meaner.
Cowherd, Political Economists and the English Poor Law (Columbus, 1977).
They have a superior cowherd, and the bosses actually do the work with you.
According to a millennia-old Chinese myth, the Weaver Maid and Cowherd fell in love and were married.
Frustration was building at Cowherd Middle School in Aurora, Ill.
Bernanos first planned to call his book A Dead Parish: A cowherd is mysteriously murdered, a young married couple commit suicide, the mayor goes mad With self-loathing, and the chatelaine, Mme.
So everyone, from cowherd to checkout operator, faces challenges like they've never seen before.
Sarah McNeill, a descendant of Highland Scots defeated in bloody battle by the English in 1746, lived past her nineteenth birthday with her parents and their cowherd, Hermie, on an adequately prosperous farm dominating the western heights of Alderney - the three square miles of rugged terrain off the tip of Normandy, infinitely smaller than the better-known Channel Isles, Jersey and Guernsey.
And he relates the story of Caedmon, the illiterate cowherd who became, with the encouragement of the royally-born Abbess Hilda, England's first Christian poet.