covenant

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covenant

a constraint placed by local government authority upon the use of land or buildings. Applies to such matters as size of lots, use to which land can be put, amount of land that can be covered by a building.
References in periodicals archive ?
By contrast, covenantal approaches are depicted with a baseline communalism that values dyad development, interdependence, support within a faith community, and sacrificing personal needs for sake of relational longevity.
Examining the fundamental concept of the Christian marriage covenant and its relationship to the psychological principles of forgiveness, we propose a model of covenantal forgiveness.
The same idea and elements of returning to the Lord after having broken the covenantal terms are also seen in the Davidic covenant when Solomon dedicated the Temple.
Having worked so hard to move beyond mere functionalist notions of what covenantal economic stewardship might entail, it is disappointing to see Pally step back at the last moment.
44) Individuals in the covenantal community discover their moral responsibility not from their essential separateness, but from their essential connectedness.
Judaism doesn't just value community; it values a covenantal community infused with sacred bonds and chosenness that make the heart strings vibrate.
A covenantal relationship is the ability of the servant leader to accept followers for who they are, not for how they make the servant leader feel.
The shift in these feeding stories where Jesus presides leads us from the new covenantal meal into meals of ministry.
His reasoning culminates in an examination of "the political as messianic" and the hope of a "new covenantal community" (267) that can prevent a modern exile of humanity from the planet.
Jones presses forward a view of covenantal baptism, grounded in a Reformed mindset, and backed, according to Jones, with a rich Baptist theological tradition.
I believe our collective inability to grieve is one more aspect of the lack of covenantal (or even casual) relationship between most of us.
The only major change (and this is not to be underestimated) is the change in perspective from a theology of covenantal exclusion for Jews post-Easter to a theology of covenantal inclusion.