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A trial comparing MACE in patients receiving iodixanol or ioxaglate during PTCA for acute coronary syndromes
Primary endpoints In-hospital MACE
Conclusion MACE is lower in high-risk patients without renal insufficiency undergoing PTCA with iodixanol than with ioxaglate

court

the persons assembled under the authority of the law to administer justice. This includes the presiding magistrate or judge, the jury if any, the counsel and advisors and witnesses for both parties.

court hierarchy
the ascending levels of the courts providing a series of higher tribunals to which appeals from lower courts can be taken. The more serious and complicated the case, the higher up in the court hierarchy it goes for primary hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plans to use telephone intercepts and other operations in court in terrorist cases won't work and could jeopardise the work of British agents, argues former intelligence officer Rod Richards THE case against allowing information from telephone intercepts, and other technical operations, being produced in courts of law as evidence is compelling for several reasons.
May 31 /PRNewswire/ -- "I believe that Arthur Andersen could have stayed in business, while legal matters proceeded, if its leadership had considered the court of public opinion to be as important as the courts of law," said Jonathan Bernstein, president of national consultancy Bernstein Crisis Management, http://www.
The impact of Freudian psychoanalysis on the interpretation of father-daughter incest in courts of law, the social sciences and child-serving agencies during the postwar period was not, as has commonly been assumed, to uniformly silence discussion and prosecution.
Courts of law have been busy recently deciding where plagiarism and piracy stop and creativity and originality begin in the literary world.
For a scientific theory, no matter how legitimate, to move forward legally and politically, the theory must be subjected to continuous scrutiny and must be able to stand before the courts of law and politics before it can actually change human nature.
Until his death, Hiss pressed for vindication - both in courts of law and in the court of public opinion.