court

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Related to courts: State courts
A trial comparing MACE in patients receiving iodixanol or ioxaglate during PTCA for acute coronary syndromes
Primary endpoints In-hospital MACE
Conclusion MACE is lower in high-risk patients without renal insufficiency undergoing PTCA with iodixanol than with ioxaglate

court

the persons assembled under the authority of the law to administer justice. This includes the presiding magistrate or judge, the jury if any, the counsel and advisors and witnesses for both parties.

court hierarchy
the ascending levels of the courts providing a series of higher tribunals to which appeals from lower courts can be taken. The more serious and complicated the case, the higher up in the court hierarchy it goes for primary hearing.
References in classic literature ?
Van der School removed his spectacles, folded them and, replacing them once more on his nose, eyed the other bill which he held in his hand, and then said, looking at the bar over the top of his glasses; I shall rest the prosecution here, if the court please.
The grave-looking yeomen who composed this tribunal laid their heads together for a few minutes, without leaving the box, when the foreman arose, and, after the forms of the court were duly observed, he pronounced the prisoner to be “Not guilty.
She carried the pepper-box in her hand, and Alice guessed who it was, even before she got into the court, by the way the people near the door began sneezing all at once.
For some minutes the whole court was in confusion, getting the Dormouse turned out, and, by the time they had settled down again, the cook had disappeared.
Maitre Henri Robert thereupon asked the court to hear Frederic Larsan on this point.
Mademoiselle Stangerson's murderer, flying through the court, was fired on; it was thought he was struck, perhaps killed.
A battery of blue bags is loaded with heavy charges of papers and carried off by clerks; the little mad old woman marches off with her documents; the empty court is locked up.
She had to stay at Court now; she had her own cage, and permission to walk out twice in the day and once at night.
And all the Court scolded, and said that the Nightingale was very ungrateful.
That your lordship was about to treat with the court.
As for the remission of your sins, we have the archbishop of Paris, who has the very greatest power at the court of Rome, and even the coadjutor, who possesses some plenary indulgences; we will recommend you to him.
But the completion of Monplaisir (Monblaisir the honest German folks call it) was stopped for lack of ready money, and it and its park and garden are now in rather a faded condition, and not more than ten times big enough to accommodate the Court of the reigning Sovereign.