counterbalancing

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count·er·bal·anc·ing

(kown'ter-bal'antz-ing),
A procedure in behavorial research for distributing unwanted but unavoidable influences equally among the different experimental conditions or subjects.
References in periodicals archive ?
I also work at four newer, large arenas, and their manual counterweight systems are much more efficient," said Sivetz.
When the counterweight is the same, the fundamental frequency of pre-stressed concrete beams showed small changes with the increase of pre-stress value.
Along with the commercial theaters, Clark installed the counterweight rigging systems in Masonic theaters, including Detroit.
So when the company, which manufactures a mix of gray iron counterweights and engineered castings, decided it needed to upgrade its melting systems to meet tightening environmental demands, Norton performed a careful analysis.
Using a 2 kg pumpkin, how much weight would you have to add to your 30-kg counterweight to beat the record by one meter?
The trebuchet constructors were aware that a hinged counterweight has a trajectory more vertical than that of a fixed counterweight and thus can fire stones to a longer distance (Chevedden et al.
boom length, features and options as its predecessor with the exception of the redesigned flexible counterweight system.
At Tuesday's presentation, Bernardo Fort-Bresica seemed to offer a counterweight to the RPA's argument, citing how the Airlines Arena spurred both commercial and residential development in Miami's downtown.
The bad news was that the counterweight extension arm was bent about five degrees from the horizontal.
In freehand style, invented by Duncan's Brown, the player end of the yo-yo string connects not to the player's hand but to a small counterweight that is heavy enough to keep the string taut yet light enough that it doesn't act as too much of a drag on the yo-yo as it gets thrown and flipped around.
THE Rev Harry Ross's little column is an instructive counterweight to human selfishness.