counterimmunoelectrophoresis


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counterimmunoelectrophoresis

 (CIE) [kown″ter-im″u-no-e-lek″tro-fo-re´sis]
a laboratory technique in which an electric current is used to accelerate the migration of antibody and antigen through a buffered diffusion medium. Antigens in a gel medium in which the pH is controlled are strongly negatively charged and will migrate rapidly across the electric field toward the anode. The antibody in such a medium is less negatively charged and will migrate in an opposite or “counter” direction toward the cathode. If the antigen and antibody are specific for each other, they combine and form a distinct precipitin line.

The technique of CIE was first applied clinically in 1970 to detect hepatitis B antigen. With modification and refinement it is becoming increasingly useful as a means of detecting antigens or antibodies specific for a variety of infectious diseases. It can be especially valuable as an aid to accurate diagnosis of clinical bacterial infections and the selection of specific therapeutic agents for control of infections once the causative organisms are identified.

count·er·im·mu·no·e·lec·tro·pho·re·sis (CIE),

(kown'ter-im'yū-nō-ĕ-lek'trō-fōr-ē'sis),
A modification of immunoelectrophoresis in which antigen (for example, serum containing hepatitis B virus) is placed in wells cut in the sheet of agar gel toward the cathode and antiserum is placed in wells toward the anode; antigen and antibody, moving in opposite directions, form precipitates in the area between the cells where they meet in concentrations of optimal proportions.

counterimmunoelectrophoresis

/coun·ter·im·mu·no·elec·tro·pho·re·sis/ (-im″u-no-e-lek″tro-for-e´sis) immunoelectrophoresis in which the antigen and antibody migrate in opposite directions.

count·er·im·mu·no·e·lec·tro·pho·re·sis

(kown'tĕr-im'yū-nō-ĕ-lek'trō-fŏr-ē'sis)
Immunoelectrophoresis in which antigen is placed in wells cut in the sheet of agar gel toward the cathode, and antiserum is placed in wells toward the anode; antigen and antibody, moving in opposite directions, form precipitates in the area between the cells where they meet in concentrations of optimal proportions.
References in periodicals archive ?
1] Nonstandard abbreviations: CA, cellulose acetate; IEP, immunoelectrophoresis; and CIE, counterimmunoelectrophoresis.
In a prospective study, we compared the HEp-2000 substrate with counterimmunoelectrophoresis for the detection of antiSSA antibodies on 2427 consecutive specimens (9).
Collectively, all published data indicate that the HEp2000 cell substrate is a highly sensitive substrate for screening for anti-SSA antibodies comparable to immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and ELISA.
Screening of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens was done by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (9) and identification by dot-blot analysis (Biomedical Diagnostics) (12).
Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (9) and dot-blot analysis for detection of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens revealed 375 samples with anti-SSA antibodies.
Counterimmunoelectrophoresis and immunodiffusion for the detection of antibodies to soluble cellular antigens.
Counterimmunoelectrophoresis with serum prediffusion: an improved method for the detection and identification of antibodies against extractable nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens.
In the present study we compared this DB with the currently used combination of counterimmunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting (CIE/IB) for the detection of antibodies against ENA.
Nonculture methods now available, such as counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and coagglutination, have failed to show uniform diagnostic sensitivity or specificity even when applied to specimens collected from patients with culture-confirmed bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia [5,6] (1) The lack of sensitive nonculture-based methods and the limitations of culture often result in only presumptive diagnoses of pneumococcal pneumonia [7].