coumarin


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coumarin

 [koo´mah-rin]
1. a principle extracted from the tonka bean, from which several anticoagulants are derived that inhibit hepatic synthesis of vitamin K–dependent coagulation factors.
2. any of these derivatives.

cou·ma·rin

(kū'mă-rin),
1. A general descriptive term applied to anticoagulants and other drugs derived from dicumarol, a component of the Tonka bean.
2. A fragrant neutral principle obtained from the Tonka bean, Dypterix odorata, and made synthetically from salicylic aldehyde; it is used to disguise unpleasant odors.
[coumarou, native name of Tonka bean]

coumarin

/cou·ma·rin/ (koo´mah-rin)
1. a principle extracted from the tonka bean; it contains a factor, dicumarol, that inhibits hepatic synthesis of vitamin K–dependent coagulation factors, and a number of its derivatives are used as anticoagulants in treating disorders characterized by excessive clotting.
2. any of these derivatives or any synthetic compound with similar activity.

coumarin

(ko͞o′mər-ĭn)
n.
A fragrant crystalline compound, C9H6O2, present in tonka beans and produced synthetically for use as a fragrance. Coumarin has been banned as a food additive in the United States because it can be toxic in large amounts.

cou′ma·ric (-mər-ĭk) adj.

coumarin

[ko̅o̅′mərin]
a class of orally active anticoagulant agents with warfarin as its prototype.
indications It is prescribed for prophylaxis and treatment of thrombosis and embolism.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to the drug prohibits its use. It is not prescribed to patients who are at risk for hemorrhage or who are pregnant.
adverse effects The most serious adverse reaction is hemorrhage. Many other drugs interact with this drug to increase or decrease its effect.

cou·ma·rin

(kū'mă-rin)
Fragrant neutral principle obtained from the Tonka bean, Dypterix odorata, and also made synthetically from salicylic aldehyde; used to disguise unpleasant odors.

coumarin,

n C9H6O, derived from a variety of sources, including tonka bean and sweet clover; may also be artificially manufactured.
Enlarge picture
Coumarin.

cou·ma·rin

(kū'mă-rin)
A general descriptive term applied to anticoagulants and other drugs derived from dicumarol.

coumarin

1. a principle extracted from the tonka bean, from which several anticoagulants are derived, that inhibits hepatic synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors.
2. any of these derivatives.
3. see also dicoumarol.
References in periodicals archive ?
The isolation of a prenyl coumarin of chemotaxonomic significance from Murraya paniculata var.
Because coladonin is a sesquiterpene coumarin and various derivatives of coumarin are commercially available, coumarins and coladonin were focused on further study.
9000-10,000), epichlorohydrin, 7-hydroxy coumarin, decanoyl chloride (DC), and FITC-dextran (M.
As found in this study, coumarin was present, sometimes in substantial amounts, in cinnamon-based food supplements and cinnamon-flavored foods," they say.
Cassia cinnamon has much higher levels of coumarin than Ceylon cinnamon - up to 63 times more
Widely used in India, the defatted seed of this herb contains trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and coumarin.
Irvine also writes that the seeds contain an aromatic crystalline principle, known as coumarin, and that the pounded leaves are used to make poultices.
Coumarin is an anti-coagulant medication usually administered orally for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders; it is essentially a rat poison, so its effect must be monitored by frequent blood tests.
But what people don't realise is that it can also contain a compound called coumarin, which can damage your liver if taken in large doses.
The European Commission's scientific committee on consumer products has for instance warned of the potential risk of allergic reactions to the common scent ingredient coumarin, following patch tests.
There is no scientific basis for claiming that coumarin, the primary chemical released by burning sweetgrass, is as dangerous as those released in second-hand cigarette smoke.
Key words: [beta]2-microglobulin, cadmium, coumarin, cytochrome P450 2A6, drug-metabolizing enzyme, environmental exposure, lead, liver drug metabolism, N-acetyl-[beta]-D-glucosaminidase, nicotine, nicotine C-oxidase, proteinuria, zinc.