cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 cm wide at apex, hollow but stuffed with a cottony matrix, tapering to base; yellowish above, brown to brownish-black below, scurfy, fibrous; no annulus.
If the inside is still soft and cottony, scoop it out and feed it to the sparrows or the compost pile.
Neustat is proud of the fact that the company can create several types of fabrics such as "a cottony hand, a silky look, slubs and matelasses, besides jacquards.
This absorbent material changes from a dry cottony texture into a gel as it absorbs water.
Settling herself on the piano bench, she was vaguely aware of rustles, murmurs, but the noises made cottony walls around her, and she inside with no sound at all, just the dim knowing that sound was going on outside somewhere.
At first they were just plain dolls, with cottony stuffing from the gourd tree in the garden and stray buttons sewn on for eyes.
Parents have responded enthusiastically to the soft, cottony feel of our cloth-like cover," said Dudley Lehman, President-Infant Care Sector.
Simply Right(TM) - Premium Diapers (sizes 3, 4 and 5): leakage protection you can trust, cottony soft, all-around stretch system, hypoallergenic for baby's sensitive skin, with animal designs
In universities I always felt the presence of a cottony wad of verbalisms between the poet and the poem--the constant presence of all kinds of extraneous and far-fetched theories and explanations of poems.
It's derived from a cottony mold called Paecilomyces fumosoroseus.
Mealybugs, living together in sticky, cottony gray masses, also make their appearance in stale air situations, whether on garden, patio or indoor plants.
Beyond the staple Frances and Elsie Wright fairy photographs, it contains much cottony ectoplasm, table-turnings gone wrong, collaged negatives, goofy double-exposures, and, especially, numerous cardboard "apparitions" that seem to have appeared after being crumpled up and stashed behind the medium's ear.