cotton

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Related to cottonwool: cotton wool disease

cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
uk TERROR OVER CHOPSTICKSTHE cottonwool fear suffered by Kimberley's friend is called bambakomallophobia.
PARENTS are often accused of wrapping their children in cottonwool these days and breeding a generation of spoilt softies.
Keogh will wrap his players up in cottonwool this week especially with Craig Owen, Sam Wilson, Craig Thomas, Matt Dodd, Justin Rowe and Phil Male all doubts.
If parents insist on keeping their kids in cottonwool and taking them to school, why not just walk with them?
She became her old self, enjoying life - she said 'It is like someone has removed the cottonwool from my brain
Come on, mankind has survived this long without the cottonwool treatment.
THIS is the age of factory-made fast food and we appear to love every pre-processed, flavourenhanced mouthful of rendered meat wrapped up in a cottonwool bun.
The ladies has peppermints and cottonwool buds to add a genteel touch.
Clearly Andy Holden - who, according to sources at Finch Farm, is so old that he failed auditions for the Quarrymen - had cottonwool in his ears when a request was made for volunteers for this photograph.
KIDDERMINSTER Harriers manager Mark Yates would have wrapped his players up in cottonwool at Crawley Town this week given the chance.
Now he is taking the Liverpool team, now called The Cottonwool Sandwiches, down to London for St George's Day where they will show off their skills in one of England's most historic venues, the Globe Theatre (the day, incidentally, also marks Shakespeare's birthday
It would be more accurate to call it the Cotton-wool State and, more accurate still, the Cottonwool Union, for the EU is the source of over half the herniating mass of regulation we face,' he said.