cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the number of cotton squares and small bolls fallen on the soil differ with the distance and the age of the plants, with the highest number of these reproductive structures fallen on strips of soil next to the rows of older cotton plants.
A greater number of individuals actively sought the cotton plants with squares compared at other combinations of the okra and cotton plants in different phenological stages (Figure 4).
Considering that the determination of irrigation and cultivating depths--those that are the best for the climate and soil conditions of the semi-arid--permits an increase in the productivity of the cotton plant, with higher efficiency for irrigation water use.
Most likely, such dynamic stem development is necessary for the cotton plants to become resistant to growth and to withstand the weight of branches and bolls during the development progress.
At harvest, plant height (cm), number of open bolls per plant, boll weight (g), seed cotton yield per plant (g) and lint (%) were measured on ten guarded plants from each plot, whereas, seed cotton yield per ha (ton) was recorded on the basis of experimental plot area by ginning all cotton plants of each plot.
pe main purpose of said study was to know pe effect of micronutrients on cotton plant growp and insect infestation.
Technician Neal Hudson (formerly with ARS) sweeps cotton plants in a study to determine the efficiency of the sweepnet for capturing adult Lygus hesperus.
Concept for monitoring the growth and development of cotton plants using main-stem node counts.
Electrode 1 of cable 1 was positioned at the base of the head ditch, where the siphon water enters the furrow, and the cotton plants started at electrode 6 on cable 1.
The laboratory bioassays showed no significant impacts of Bt cotton plant structures (leaves and flower-bolls) on the larval mortality as compared to conventional non-Bt cotton.
There's already plenty of evidence that the Bt-toxin produced in GM corn and cotton plants is toxic to humans and mammals and triggers immune system responses.