cotton

(redirected from cotton plant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although collected in leaf litter and occasionally on the leaves of cotton plants, the vast majority of these bugs were found within the bolls.
Winter cereal species and planting date had only a small effect on mainstem node number and height of the lowest boll on the cotton plants (Table 6).
It is expected that each of these environments can provide different conditions or resources, which would be of greater or lesser degree, exploited by boll weevil in the absence of cotton plants.
1] with the increase of irrigation depths, and concluded that the best results for the cotton plant are presented when applying irrigation with 100% of the necessary depth.
These results indicate that using the product for seed treatment effectively controls initial cotton plant development, thereby facilitating the management of the cotton culture.
These data indicate that each of these two factors act dependently on all the studied traits of cotton plant (except lint percentage) meaning that mineral N fertilizer rates responded differently (P [less than or equal to] 0.
Cotton plant damage was simulated by artificially removing cotton leaves and fruiting bodies.
Four tenders for the supply of (a) what is sufficient to cover 70,000 feddans land with insecticides from the recommended and registered bio compounds that fight cotton plant leaves warm eggs hatching, (b) what is sufficient to cover 700,000 feddans land with special and chemical compounds insecticides that fight reproduction of cotton plant leaves warm, (c) what is sufficient to cover 950,000 feddans land with phosphoric compounds and compounds also (d) what is sufficient to cover 310,000 feddans land with biro-thyroid compounds and compounds within the chemical set of the new recommended and registered compounds that fight cotton plant blossoms warms.