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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
This proves the concept that we'll be able to come up with new and novel fibers for the textile industry'' by genetically engineering the cotton plant, said Maliyakal E.
Quantification of Cry1Ac and Cry1F Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins in selected transgenic cotton plant tissue types.
For every kilogram of fiber, commercial cotton plants produce about 1.
Obtaining cotton plants with an adequate height for growing with smaller between-row spacings and at higher population densities than usual is important for the success of the crop, particularly when it is planted during non-ideal periods (NAGASHIMA et al.
At each location, 20 cotton plants were randomly selected and 5 bolls from each plant were removed and placed into a plastic bag.
Its assets include an interest in 2,100 acres of farmland near Cotton Plant (Woodruff County), C&I Electrical Supply (estimated annual sales: $4 million), Consolidated Insurance (estimated annual sales: $2.
This is the suitable time to irrigate cotton plant, but the shortage of water in biannual canals in the area is a real threat for the crop, said an agriculture expert.
The big-eyed bug preys on spider mites ((Tetranychus species), serious pests of the cotton plant.
Defoliation is important to high crop yields and cotton quality as the leaves of a cotton plant, if not removed, can stain the white cotton fibers during the harvest process.
Industrial hemp is more versatile than the precious soybean, the mainstay cotton plant and the reliable Douglas fir, combined.