cotton


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Related to cotton: silk

cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in classic literature ?
He repaid them in kind with large extracts from his invaluable author, Cotton Mather, and added many marvellous events that had taken place in his native State of Connecticut, and fearful sights which he had seen in his nightly walks about Sleepy Hollow.
when should I ever have thought of putting by in cotton a piece of courtplaister that Frank Churchill had been pulling about
Chillip, looking mildly at my aunt with his head on one side, and making her a little bow, said, in allusion to the jewellers' cotton, as he softly touched his left ear:
I don't see what it has to do with us, since you are not in the cotton trade.
Often, when du Bousquier went to a grand dinner, he would take Rene to wait at table; on such occasions he made him take off his blue cotton jacket, with its big pockets hanging round his hips, and always bulging with handkerchiefs, clasp-knives, fruits, or a handful of nuts, and forced him to put on a regulation coat.
Higginbotham was as well known at Parker's Falls as any citizen of the place, being part owner of the slitting mill, and a considerable stockholder in the cotton factories.
This was the renowned Cotton Mather, minister of the Old North Church in Boston.
Some Manchester chaps said it was as good as any Sea Island cotton on the market.
Alone, I should have been ignorant of the names of these giant growths, but our men of science pointed out the cedars, the great silk cotton trees, and the redwood trees, with all that profusion of various plants which has made this continent the chief supplier to the human race of those gifts of Nature which depend upon the vegetable world, while it is the most backward in those products which come from animal life.
Their one object seemed to be to plant nothing but cotton; and in many cases cotton was planted up to the very door of the cabin.
She then fell upon the ground and the boy rolled her back and forth like a rolling-pin, until the cotton had filled all the spaces in her patchwork covering and the body had lengthened to its fullest extent.
Instead he drew a dingy, ragged dress from the bundle beneath the thwart and in this disguised himself as an old woman, drawing a cotton wimple low over his head and forehead to hide his short hair.