cotinine


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co·ti·nine

(kō'ti-nēn), Do not confuse this word with cotarnine.
One of the major detoxication products of nicotine; eliminated rapidly and completely by the kidneys.
[anagram of nicotine]

cotinine

(kōt′n-ēn′)
n.
The major metabolite of nicotine that indicates levels of nicotine intake.

cotinine

A urinary metabolite of nicotine used to monitor exposure to environmental tobacco smoke–ETS. See Environmental tobacco smoke.

co·ti·nine

(kō'ti-nēn)
One of the major detoxication products of nicotine; eliminated rapidly and completely by the kidneys.

cotinine (kō´tinēn),

n a substance that remains in body fluids after nicotine has been used. Presence of this chemical in body fluids is considered proof of recent nicotine use. It is currently being studied for its possible contribution to a range of oral diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
96nl/ml of cotinine in their saliva, while in 1998 this had reduced to 0.
The PTS Detect system measures quantified cotinine (a byproduct of nicotine) levels from 25 ng/ml to 200 ng/ml in just 5 minutes.
A trained examiner, blinded to the children's cotinine levels, administered the IQ tests individually to each child in a quiet room.
We believe that routine or selective serum or urine cotinine testing will enable us to stratify risk in both elective and reconstructive scenarios.
Nicotine can only be measured for a short time in blood but cotinine is a metabolite of nicotine that can be detected for up to two weeks after inhaling tobacco smoke.
Cotinine levels in the seven-year-olds were four times higher than in children of non-smoking mothers, research found.
Participants who reported having smoked "at least one day" in the last month or "at least one cigarette" in the last month, or those who had serum cotinine concentrations over 10 ng/ml were classified as active smokers.
The urine cotinine levels, DNA damage and values of oxidation for the group exposed to cigarette smoke were much higher compared to those in the group not exposed to cigarette smoke, the scientists said.
This is the first time cotinine data among electronic cigarette users in real-life conditions are published.
Reality: This is impossible because of the enormous differences in cotinine levels in tobacco users versus nonusers condemned to share enclosed spaces with them.
The rate of hearing loss appeared to be cumulative, increasing with the level of cotinine detected by blood tests.
They defined exposure as having at least one smoker in the house and by serum cotinine levels of 0.