cost-effectiveness ratio

cost-effectiveness ratio

The ratio of the costs of a healthcare intervention (compared to the alternative—e.g., non-intervention or best alternative treatment) to the change in effects of the intervention—e.g., avoiding a relapse in a cancer patient, heart attack in a hypertensive patient.
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For CEA, the difference in mean cost between the 2 interventions (new cost minus old cost) is divided by the difference in mean effectiveness (eg, new survival rate minus old survival rate) to get an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER).
Such a process would lead to a higher cost-effectiveness ratio.
Overall, the contingent screening test showed a cost-effectiveness ratio of $26,833 Canadian dollars per case of DS.
For example, the EPDS had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 41 103 [pounds sterling] per quality-adjusted life year (QALY--a combined measure of quantity and quality of life) compared with routine care.
There is no universal criterion that defines a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio, below which an intervention would be considered cost-effective.
From a historical perspective, and in terms of the interaction between offensive and defensive systems, changes in "delivery methods" of firepower can be understood as simply the continuous evolution of the cost-effectiveness ratio.
Indeed, the mean cost-effectiveness ratio of providing a 3-month intensive smoking cessation intervention (SCI) to hospitalized smokers in a 209-patient randomized controlled trial was $1,443 per year of life gained, according to Dr.
The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US$10,960 per year of live saved.
Recent developments in economic methods emphasize the importance of quantifying uncertainty about the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio by examining the joint density of cost and effect differences (20-23).
The group then selected and analyzed 17 large-scale health interventions whose impact showed a cost-effectiveness ratio of less than $100 per disability-adjusted life year, or DALY, saved.
In other words, the cost-effectiveness ratio reflects how much more it costs to achieve one additional unit of outcome with one treatment intervention than with another intervention.