cosmopolitan

(redirected from cosmopolitanism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tan),
In the biologic sciences, a term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]

cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tăn)
biologic sciences A term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether we view cosmopolitanism as altruism, social gospel, or secular humanism, we must recognize how it addresses the intrinsic, unique characteristics of the human condition and the need to transcend boundaries in the interest of contributing to the global human community.
There are various definitions of and approaches to cosmopolitanism in the literature.
Cosmopolitanism aims to bridge cultural differences through experience, communication, and the exchange of ideas.
Cosmopolitanism does understand the place of birth and the consequential communal bond or affiliation of an individual as completely coincidental and contingent.
Third Chorus, Back Inside" features the less privileged cosmopolitanism of percussionist Nii Otoo Annan, whose polyrhythmic improvisations with the sounds oh toads, crickets, and ocean waves reveal sonic and spiritual connections to diasporic consciousness.
Such espousal of the articulation of other cosmopolitan experiences serves to provide what has been termed a "radical critique" of the dominant/iconic tendencies of Western cosmopolitanism (Burton 216).
In her suggestive Through Other Continents, Wai Chee Dimock introduces a notion of "world literature" and cosmopolitanism articulated temporally rather than spatially.
The concept of cosmopolitanism has been employed for over two millennia, having been first used by the ancient Greeks.
Also, did Soho's cosmopolitanism inure it from some of the more widely felt anxieties that emerged from increased transnational cultural circulation in this period, most notably fears of "Americanization?
9) Following this is a discussion of hybridity, subsidiarity, solidarism and multi-level governance--concepts that are regarded as subsets of cosmopolitanism in this particular paper, with no intention to oversimplify their complex meanings.
Second, and perhaps more important, I will show that a more contextual reading of the novel is particularly well suited to help us understand how critical cosmopolitanism must always emerge and exist in reflexive tension with the dominant ideologies of any given venue, including those ideologies of the home country.
In the introduction, the editors explore "Processes of Cosmopolitanism and Parochialism" in an attempt to lay out a framework for the remaining chapters.